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  1. #21
    Technician CThurman's Avatar
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Tri-Flow (WD40 knock off) works really well. I dont use it on neoprene style bizhub rollers tho..


  2. #22
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Iowatech View Post
    As long as we are talking about cleaners, anybody have a take on "Mr. Clean" Magic Erasers (http://www.mrclean.com/en_US/magic-eraser.do)? We use them mainly to remove caked on toner from developer (mag) rollers during a developer change, but they seem to work nicely in other applications, too.
    Those magic erasers are awesome for most household applications (although I think they leave a residue). But you got me curious, I will have to try it out.

    On the topic of Neoprene vs WD40:
    Neoprene is a vulcanized polymer (making it in fact a [synthetic] rubber). I am no chemist, but I just spent some time reading about neoprene and WD40. I have found that adverse effects of WD40 when applied to neoprene are nearly nonexistent.

    According to the "Technical Data Sheet" for WD40:
    "Surface Compatibility
    For all variations : WD-40 demonstrates none to negligible deleterious effect to plastic, rubber, and metal hard surfaces. This includes Acetal, neoprene/hard rubber, HDPE, PPS Copolymer Polysulfone, Teflon, Viton, steel, galvanized steel hot dip, electroplated, copper, brass, magnesium, nickel, tin plate, titanium, and zinc."

    However, the same document does note:
    "Surface Cautions
    Nearly all surfaces interact with WD-40 as they would any high grade ali-phatic petroleum spirit. Certain types of rubber will swell upon prolonged immersion. Wax polishes and certain wax coatings may be softened by WD-40. Clear polycarbonate and polystyrene may stress craze or crack. Always test surfaces first."

    This reminds me of my idiot friend putting power steering fluid (a purely petroleum product) in his brake master cylinder, because the power steering fluid will make the rubber seals swell, he flushed and replaced several parts to the brake system.
    Alas, WD40 is not power steering fluid. I lost the link, but some guy soaked some rubber o-rings in WD40 for an entire month and they performed just fine after, although they were probably not neoprene; however, this illustrates that the petroleum prowess of WD40 is quite low.

    WD40 FAQS:

    "WD-40 Multi-Use Product can be used on just about everything. It is safe to use on metal, rubber, wood and plastic. It can also be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40 Multi-Use Product."

    As far as I can tell, neoprene is neither a polycarbonate or clear polystyrene plastic.
    Then again, I hear that WD40 will dissolve neoprene gloves...

    Either way, I find it interesting that according to the interwebs, WD40 can cure arthritis, keep flies off cows, attract fish when used on bait, prevent squirrels from climbing into a birdhouse, free a tongue stuck to frozen metal in winter, et cetera.


  3. #23
    Just a fellow wanderer 1,000+ Posts Iowatech's Avatar
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Synaux View Post
    Those magic erasers are awesome for most household applications (although I think they leave a residue). But you got me curious, I will have to try it out.

    On the topic of Neoprene vs WD40:
    Neoprene is a vulcanized polymer (making it in fact a [synthetic] rubber). I am no chemist, but I just spent some time reading about neoprene and WD40. I have found that adverse effects of WD40 when applied to neoprene are nearly nonexistent.

    According to the "Technical Data Sheet" for WD40:
    "Surface Compatibility
    For all variations : WD-40 demonstrates none to negligible deleterious effect to plastic, rubber, and metal hard surfaces. This includes Acetal, neoprene/hard rubber, HDPE, PPS Copolymer Polysulfone, Teflon, Viton, steel, galvanized steel hot dip, electroplated, copper, brass, magnesium, nickel, tin plate, titanium, and zinc."

    However, the same document does note:
    "Surface Cautions
    Nearly all surfaces interact with WD-40 as they would any high grade ali-phatic petroleum spirit. Certain types of rubber will swell upon prolonged immersion. Wax polishes and certain wax coatings may be softened by WD-40. Clear polycarbonate and polystyrene may stress craze or crack. Always test surfaces first."

    This reminds me of my idiot friend putting power steering fluid (a purely petroleum product) in his brake master cylinder, because the power steering fluid will make the rubber seals swell, he flushed and replaced several parts to the brake system.
    Alas, WD40 is not power steering fluid. I lost the link, but some guy soaked some rubber o-rings in WD40 for an entire month and they performed just fine after, although they were probably not neoprene; however, this illustrates that the petroleum prowess of WD40 is quite low.

    WD40 FAQS:

    "WD-40 Multi-Use Product can be used on just about everything. It is safe to use on metal, rubber, wood and plastic. It can also be applied to painted metal surfaces without harming the paint. Polycarbonate and clear polystyrene plastic are among the few surfaces on which to avoid using a petroleum-based product like WD-40 Multi-Use Product."

    As far as I can tell, neoprene is neither a polycarbonate or clear polystyrene plastic.
    Then again, I hear that WD40 will dissolve neoprene gloves...

    Either way, I find it interesting that according to the interwebs, WD40 can cure arthritis, keep flies off cows, attract fish when used on bait, prevent squirrels from climbing into a birdhouse, free a tongue stuck to frozen metal in winter, et cetera.
    I don't know about the cow flies or arthritis things, but back in the day I did get to see a guy seat the bead of a split rim tire using WD40 and fire. I've been lead to believe that is no longer possible, though. Oh, well.


  4. #24
    Master Of The Obvious 5,000+ Posts


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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Iowatech View Post
    I don't know about the cow flies or arthritis things, but back in the day I did get to see a guy seat the bead of a split rim tire using WD40 and fire. I've been lead to believe that is no longer possible, though. Oh, well.
    Yeah, I've seen it done with starting fluid and a match. Impressive flare up. =^..^=

    If you'd like a serious answer to your request:
    1) demonstrate that you've read the manual
    2) demonstrate that you made some attempt to fix it.


    blackcat: Master Of The Obvious =^..^=

  5. #25
    East Coast Imaging 2,500+ Posts


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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    I used to use wd40 on certain rubber feed rollers and path rollers. It'd seemed all good until a couple a months later, the rubber turned like a sticky putty. Bad, Bad, Bad. Jams galore. Never again. DO NOT USE ANY KIND OF SOLUTION BESIDES ALCOHOL, SOAP OR WATER.

    Canon Copier Repair Service. Sales, Parts & Toner. NYC/NJ area. Contact:East Coast Imaging Solutions,LLC

  6. #26
    Service Manager 100+ Posts Claudio's Avatar
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    The way I see it, if cleaning it with plain watered down windex does'nt do it, then its time to replace the rollers. Trying to clean them with any harsher cleaners will only earn you an extra trip to the customer's here and there. Cheaper to fix it right the first time


  7. #27
    East Coast Imaging 2,500+ Posts


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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Claudio View Post
    The way I see it, if cleaning it with plain watered down windex does'nt do it, then its time to replace the rollers. Trying to clean them with any harsher cleaners will only earn you an extra trip to the customer's here and there. Cheaper to fix it right the first time
    Agree

    Canon Copier Repair Service. Sales, Parts & Toner. NYC/NJ area. Contact:East Coast Imaging Solutions,LLC

  8. #28
    Just a fellow wanderer 1,000+ Posts Iowatech's Avatar
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by SCREWTAPE View Post
    I used to use wd40 on certain rubber feed rollers and path rollers. It'd seemed all good until a couple a months later, the rubber turned like a sticky putty. Bad, Bad, Bad. Jams galore. Never again. DO NOT USE ANY KIND OF SOLUTION BESIDES ALCOHOL, SOAP OR WATER.
    Drop the alcohol and your golden. Soapy water works best, but alcohol wrecks rubber, so that won't work even a little bit.


  9. #29
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Iowatech View Post
    Drop the alcohol and your golden. Soapy water works best, but alcohol wrecks rubber, so that won't work even a little bit.
    WD 40, then a mild cleaner. WD 40 cleans thoroughly and quickly. I've recently cleaned without wd because I ran out and was slow to resupply. Cleaning large, hard to move reg. rollers while cleaning with water is painful.


  10. #30
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    Re: Rubber rejuvenator? any suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by krm View Post
    WD 40, then a mild cleaner. WD 40 cleans thoroughly and quickly. I've recently cleaned without wd because I ran out and was slow to resupply. Cleaning large, hard to move reg. rollers while cleaning with water is painful.
    Who started the use of WD 40 on rubber feed rollers ???

    Have you read the cleaning instructions for feed rollers on service documention on any given machine? no matter what make.

    Worked for 23 years for xerox, never used it on any model. 9 years for canon , same thing.
    I can see many of you like it for it's cleaning power, but it is not for rubber feed rollers.
    96 % Denaturated alcohol mixed with acetone is what i have been using for manny years with no problems.
    Or you can try this: "Blanket wash"used on offset presses, special for all rubber rollers, The best rubber rejuvenator!! only draw back,smell.

    Anybody willing to give it a try?

    Let me know your findings.


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