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  1. #1
    Service Manager 250+ Posts
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    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    Before i run the test i prepare the machine as followed:

    Check the maintenance counters to see if machine is decent.
    Check the raw output with PG1, 4 and 10.
    Clean the lasers windows with a stick
    Clean developers in service mode
    Clean inside machine from maintenance menu.
    Full adjust on normal and heavy paper.

    Now machine is ready for optimal performance.

    I use decent paper Nuesidler/Mondi Color copy, CLC Hi grade, Xerox Colotech, 4cc. I believe the first 3 are the same product actually. 100, 160 and 200grms.

    I try to print some photo's i made with a Canon Dslr, photo's i pick are taken with good exposure and maximum focus.

    Machines i tried: IRC3220, CLC2620, IRC4580, CLC4040, IRC2380, IRC2880, IRC1021. MP540 (yes a Pixma, ink based)

    Drivers are UFR and PS3.

    Output on above machine vary from punch, grain and resolution. But colors are pretty accurate or at least "neutral" tone. Where the 1021 and 4040 where the nicest overall and the 3220 had most neutral tone and "headroom"

    Now comes the new contender IR Advance C50xx, i tried several once 5030, 5035 and a 5051. New or in working order. All with newest ITB.

    I tried all drivers, with all color and profile settings. Quality settings, Color settings and even several SM settings about image processing. ARCDAT on and Off.

    I print from Windows photo print wizzard, Gimp, Photoshop and direct from Adv Space or network share.

    Anyhow the same result: colors are way too saturated, or faces to dark. Am i the only one or does somebody have the same experience?

    Playing the several settings and scanning test prints i suspect there is a problem where PDL image processing sends it's signal the main image processings stream. And PDL image processing is using a wrong Gamma, maybe 1.8 or 2.2 where the main process was expecting 1.4. To bad this isn;t very documented in Service Manual.


  2. #2
    Indentured Servant 500+ Posts D_L_P's Avatar
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    Take a look at this thread

    Canon IR-C5180i prints coming out to dark


  3. #3
    East Coast Imaging 2,500+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    SCREWTAPE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fer View Post
    Before i run the test i prepare the machine as followed:

    Check the maintenance counters to see if machine is decent.
    Check the raw output with PG1, 4 and 10.
    Clean the lasers windows with a stick
    Clean developers in service mode
    Clean inside machine from maintenance menu.
    Full adjust on normal and heavy paper.

    Now machine is ready for optimal performance.

    I use decent paper Neusiedler/Mondi Color copy, CLC Hi grade, Xerox Colotech, 4cc. I believe the first 3 are the same product actually. 100, 160 and 200 grams.

    I try to print some photo's i made with a Canon Dslr, photo's i pick are taken with good exposure and maximum focus.

    Machines i tried: IRC3220, CLC2620, IRC4580, CLC4040, IRC2380, IRC2880, IRC1021. MP540 (yes a Pixma, ink based)

    Drivers are UFR and PS3.

    Output on above machine vary from punch, grain and resolution. But colors are pretty accurate or at least "neutral" tone. Where the 1021 and 4040 where the nicest overall and the 3220 had most neutral tone and "headroom"

    Now comes the new contender IR Advance C50xx, i tried several once 5030, 5035 and a 5051. New or in working order. All with newest ITB.

    I tried all drivers, with all color and profile settings. Quality settings, Color settings and even several SM settings about image processing. ARCDAT on and Off.

    I print from Windows photo print wizard, Gimp, Photoshop and direct from Adv Space or network share.

    Anyhow the same result: colors are way too saturated, or faces to dark. Am i the only one or does somebody have the same experience?

    Playing the several settings and scanning test prints i suspect there is a problem where PDL image processing sends it's signal the main image processings stream. And PDL image processing is using a wrong Gamma, maybe 1.8 or 2.2 where the main process was expecting 1.4. To bad this isn;t very documented in Service Manual.
    Are you only experiencing this high saturation with the Advance models.

    What print drivers are being used on the C50xx model.

    Canon Copier Repair Service. Sales, Parts & Toner. NYC/NJ area. Contact:East Coast Imaging Solutions,LLC

  4. #4
    Service Manager 10,000+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    teckat's Avatar
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    The quality equation

    Three questions need to be answered to determine the maximum-sized, highest-quality print you can get from your photos.
    QUESTIONS:
    1.
    How many pixels are in my photo?
    2.
    At what resolution should I print my photos?
    3.
    What is the maximum-sized, highest-quality print I can make once I know the answers to questions 1 and 2?


    1.
    If you are taking pictures at the maximum setting that your camera allows, the following table will show you what the typical maximum pixel count will be for your photos. If you look at the 5-megapixel camera row in the 240-ppi printer resolution table, you'll see that the typical maximum resolution setting for taking photos is 1944 x 2592 pixels.
    2.
    The minimum recommended resolution (measured in pixels-per-inch, or ppi) for printing quality photos is 240 ppi.
    3.
    When you divide the ppi into the number of pixels in your photo, the result is the maximum size (in inches) that your print should be to retain the highest quality.

    240-ppi printer resolution
    Megapixel Camera = Photo Pixel Count Maximum Setting =Printer Resolution= Print Size
    1= 960 x 1280 =240 PPI =4 x 5.3
    2=1240 x 1600 =240 PPI =5 x 6.7
    3=1536 x 2048 =240 PPI =6.4 x 8.5
    4=1704 x 2272 =240 PPI =7.1 x 9.5
    5=1944 x 2592 =240 PPI =8.1 x 10.8
    7=2304 x 3072 =240 PPI =9.6 x 12.8
    8=2448 x 3264 =240 PPI =10.2 x 13.6

    The following sample calculation used a photo taken with a 5-megapixel camera:
    1944 240 = 8.1
    2592 240 = 10.8
    The maximum-quality print size for a 5-megapixel photo is 8.1 x 10.8 inches, or an 8 x 10-inch print.
    If you choose to print your photos at a resolution of 300 ppi, use the following table to determine pixel-count, printer resolution, and maximum print size.
    300-ppi printer resolution
    Megapixel Camera =Photo Pixel Count Maximum Setting =Printer Resolution = Print Size
    1=960 x 1280=240 PPI =3.2 x 4.3
    2=1200 x 1600=300 PPI =4.0 x 5.3
    3=1536 x 2048=300 PPI =5.1 x 6.8
    4=1704 x 2272=300 PPI =5.7 x 7.6
    5=1944 x 2592=300 PPI =6.5 x 8.6
    7=2304 x 3072=300 PPI =7.7 x 10.2
    8=2448 x 3264=300 PPI =8.2 x 10.9

    Quality equation example

    If you try to print a photo larger than its photo resolution allows, your print quality will decrease.
    The following illustration is a blown-up section from a 1536 x 2048-pixel photo printed at two different sizes with a printer resolution of 240 ppi. The difference between the two pictures demonstrates how resolution dictates the quality of your print size. In the 8 x 10 example, you can clearly see the hair is blurring, the facial features are pixilated, and the edges are extremely jagged. The quality of the 5 x 7-inch photo is much better.
    print_bestprint_02.jpg
    Looking back at the 240-ppi table, you can see that the 5 x 7-inch print of the 1536 x 2048-pixel photo is within the quality print size of 6.4 x 8.5 shown in the table. The 8 x 10-inch print exceeds that size, so the quality is decreased.
    Make great prints

    Now that you know what goes into creating a great print, you can use the tables provided in this article to better ensure the quality of your printed photos. Keep in mind that each camera on the market varies in terms of the resolution settings. Read your camera's manual to better understand the maximum number of pixels you can capture and how to adjust those settings if needed.
    Remember this general rule: the larger the prints you want to make, the more pixels you need in your photos. If you want more pixels in your photos, you need a higher-megapixel camera.

    Last edited by teckat; 10-23-2010 at 06:08 PM.
    **Knowledge is time consuming, exhausting and costly for a trained Tech.**

  5. #5
    East Coast Imaging 2,500+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    SCREWTAPE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teckat View Post
    The quality equation

    Three questions need to be answered to determine the maximum-sized, highest-quality print you can get from your photos.
    QUESTIONS:
    1.
    How many pixels are in my photo?
    2.
    At what resolution should I print my photos?
    3.
    What is the maximum-sized, highest-quality print I can make once I know the answers to questions 1 and 2?


    1.
    If you are taking pictures at the maximum setting that your camera allows, the following table will show you what the typical maximum pixel count will be for your photos. If you look at the 5-megapixel camera row in the 240-ppi printer resolution table, you'll see that the typical maximum resolution setting for taking photos is 1944 x 2592 pixels.
    2.
    The minimum recommended resolution (measured in pixels-per-inch, or ppi) for printing quality photos is 240 ppi.
    3.
    When you divide the ppi into the number of pixels in your photo, the result is the maximum size (in inches) that your print should be to retain the highest quality.

    240-ppi printer resolution
    Megapixel cameraPhoto Pixel Count Maximum SettingPrinter ResolutionPrint Size1
    960 x 1280
    240 PPI
    4 x 5.3
    2
    1200 x 1600
    240 PPI
    5 x 6.7
    3
    1536 x 2048
    240 PPI
    6.4 x 8.5
    4
    1704 x 2272
    240 PPI
    7.1 x 9.5
    5
    1944 x 2592
    240 PPI
    8.1 x 10.8
    7
    2304 x 3072
    240 PPI
    9.6 x 12.8
    8
    2448 x 3264
    240 PPI
    10.2 x 13.6

    The following sample calculation used a photo taken with a 5-megapixel camera:
    1944 240 = 8.1
    2592 240 = 10.8
    The maximum-quality print size for a 5-megapixel photo is 8.1 x 10.8 inches, or an 8 x 10-inch print.
    If you choose to print your photos at a resolution of 300 ppi, use the following table to determine pixel-count, printer resolution, and maximum print size.
    300-ppi printer resolution
    Megapixel cameraPhoto Pixel Count Maximum SettingPrinter ResolutionPrint Size1
    960 x 1280
    240 PPI
    3.2 x 4.3
    2
    1200 x 1600
    300 PPI
    4.0 x 5.3
    3
    1536 x 2048
    300 PPI
    5.1 x 6.8
    4
    1704 x 2272
    300 PPI
    5.7 x 7.6
    5
    1944 x 2592
    300 PPI
    6.5 x 8.6
    7
    2304 x 3072
    300 PPI
    7.7 x 10.2
    8
    2448 x 3264
    300 PPI
    8.2 x 10.9

    Quality equation example

    If you try to print a photo larger than its photo resolution allows, your print quality will decrease.
    The following illustration is a blown-up section from a 1536 x 2048-pixel photo printed at two different sizes with a printer resolution of 240 ppi. The difference between the two pictures demonstrates how resolution dictates the quality of your print size. In the 8 x 10 example, you can clearly see the hair is blurring, the facial features are pixilated, and the edges are extremely jagged. The quality of the 5 x 7-inch photo is much better.
    print_bestprint_02.jpg
    Looking back at the 240-ppi table, you can see that the 5 x 7-inch print of the 1536 x 2048-pixel photo is within the quality print size of 6.4 x 8.5 shown in the table. The 8 x 10-inch print exceeds that size, so the quality is decreased.
    Make great prints

    Now that you know what goes into creating a great print, you can use the tables provided in this article to better ensure the quality of your printed photos. Keep in mind that each camera on the market varies in terms of the resolution settings. Read your camera's manual to better understand the maximum number of pixels you can capture and how to adjust those settings if needed.
    Remember this general rule: the larger the prints you want to make, the more pixels you need in your photos. If you want more pixels in your photos, you need a higher-megapixel camera.
    Good Point.

    Canon Copier Repair Service. Sales, Parts & Toner. NYC/NJ area. Contact:East Coast Imaging Solutions,LLC

  6. #6
    Service Manager 250+ Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_L_P View Post
    That one is easy, PCL drivers sets "gray compensation" off onstead of printer default where the default is "on" for the 5180. So changing the setting for gray compensation fix the bold letters.


  7. #7
    Service Manager 250+ Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCREWTAPE View Post
    Are you only experiencing this high saturation with the Advance models.

    What print drivers are being used on the C50xx model.
    Like i said all the previous machines are pretty neutral, just the advance has to much saturation. I use PCL6, UFR2 and PS3 for printing.

    Tecket: I used a Canon Eos S1000 at the highest quality jpeg setting.


  8. #8
    East Coast Imaging 2,500+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    SCREWTAPE's Avatar
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    Make sure firmware is up to date as well.

    Canon Copier Repair Service. Sales, Parts & Toner. NYC/NJ area. Contact:East Coast Imaging Solutions,LLC

  9. #9
    Service Manager 10,000+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    teckat's Avatar
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    One Word Hammermill Paper Company in 1923
    Founders.jpg

    **Knowledge is time consuming, exhausting and costly for a trained Tech.**

  10. #10
    Service Manager 10,000+ Posts
    How do i print a decent photo on an Advance C50xx?

    teckat's Avatar
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    **Knowledge is time consuming, exhausting and costly for a trained Tech.**

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