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  1. #1
    Dangerous with Tools 1,000+ Posts
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    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    Ok here's a new one. I've got a tech who's got a HP 4250 asking him to change the date and time. So he changed it and now he's getting and Internal Clock Error 11.00.01 and bad Loc ID. Anybody have this before?

    Bad formatter, battery, firmware...? or something setup wrong or vital info erased...?


  2. #2
    A+, MCP, MCSE Steve0's Avatar
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    Check Date format (YYYY/MMM/DD) and Time format (24 Hour).

    Good luck


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    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    Thanks for your help. I gave him the info you gave me. He said it let him change the date and time, but when he powered off /on it asked him to enter it again.

    I suggested that he check the battery and he said it was bad. We think the printer will print if he hits ok, so we're going to leave it up to his customer whether or not they want to replace the formatter or hit the button.

    The non-networked formatter apparently has a battery that's soldered in place, otherwise we'd try replacing it (network version just has a clip holding it so it could be removed without too much trouble).


  4. #4
    Master Of The Obvious 10,000+ Posts
    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    blackcat4866's Avatar
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    It's fairly easy to change the soldered on NiCad backup battery. When some of the Mita copiers were getting 9 years old the batteries would die. The symptom that I would get was loss of door specs, and the maintenance light would blink (instead of staying on steady like it should).

    Most of these batteries are 3.3VDC and are charged on the 5VDC line. NiCad batteries last best when they are charged, discharged, charged, discharged. A backup battery rarely discharges.

    The test is obvious. Put the meter across the battery then pull the plug. On a good battery the voltage should gradually drop to around 3.5VDC then hold solid. On a dead battery it will just keep dropping, sometimes very quickly, to 1.8VDC or less. I remember one case where it took only 5 seconds to drop to 0.2VDC.

    I can help you find a replacement battery if you like. They are readily available, even at Radio Shack. Just do your soldering quickly. I've fried a few by being too slow. =^..^=

    If you'd like a serious answer to your request:
    1) demonstrate that you've read the manual
    2) demonstrate that you made some attempt to fix it.
    3) if you're going to ask about jams include the jam code.
    4) if you're going to ask about an error code include the error code.


    blackcat: Master Of The Obvious =^..^=

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    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    thanks - ill let him know.


  6. #6
    Service Manager 100+ Posts CanonHPTech's Avatar
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    Come on, printer techs don't solder anything. They just swap till they drop.

    The glass maybe half full, but less is more...
    Printer + Fax + Copier = Jack Of Many Trades,
    but Master Of None
    Color Copier = Not A Color Printer
    InkJet MFP = Not A Fax Machine
    B/W Copier = Not A Press
    Finisher = Deal Closer (salesman, not accessory)
    Copier Tech = Admin's Stress Ball (Scapegoat)

  7. #7
    Dangerous with Tools 1,000+ Posts
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    I've heard that one before...but then again I've heard many a copier tech claim to know how to troubleshoot and didnt know squat. I have an electronics degree and I began on copiers (Toshiba/Lanier). You and I both began around the same time in the industry, so I should think you'd know better. Some copier techs begin as printer techs and learn as they go. Not everyone knows how to solder, but everyone has to begin somewhere. I'm sure you were an idiot your first 2 or 3 years, too. You probably still do dumb things to the machines, I do.

    The main reason printer techs dont do too much soldering is the parts are cheaper than copiers and time is money. Sometimes its worth it, sometimes its not. Availability of the part, distance from the office, how many calls we have, cost of the part, profit to be made, and time to be used all come into play. The more experience you have the more you can do, the faster you can do it, and the more confidence you have in trying something new. I have replaced a new plastic frame on a 8100 PIU in the field before, but I dont know any copier techs who've tried it. I've known plenty of copier techs who make a jumper wire on the board to fix the problem only to make a second trip because it was a "quick fix" that didnt really fix the problem (Half the time you guys dont even put all the screws back in the machine). I cant tell you how many times I've seen things super glued, duct taped, or electrical taped together. I'd rather see someone replace the whole part than that.

    I'm not angry, I've just heard that crap one too many times. 60% of office machine problems are created by technicians (statistic applies to both printer and copier techs). We need to be teaching and training the newbie techs better, not berating them for something you, I and everyone else in the industry had to learn and go through. Somewhere along the line we forgot that, CanonHPTech.


  8. #8
    Master Of The Obvious 10,000+ Posts
    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    blackcat4866's Avatar
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    I gotta say she's right. =^..^=

    If you'd like a serious answer to your request:
    1) demonstrate that you've read the manual
    2) demonstrate that you made some attempt to fix it.
    3) if you're going to ask about jams include the jam code.
    4) if you're going to ask about an error code include the error code.


    blackcat: Master Of The Obvious =^..^=

  9. #9
    Service Manager 100+ Posts CanonHPTech's Avatar
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    Let me be clear... I was a printer tech (still am) way before I was a copier tech... I actually hate the way most copier techs think (bubble gum fixes)... however, copier dealerships of all sizes lean on techs heavily, but realize that they produce the most cost with no return or profits, so they constantly threaten and batter ears over part prices... and the difference between a HP LJ 8100 and a Canon IR 3570 is that you can swap the Fuser and maybe the PIU on a LJ 8100 and be done wit the printer for a few years where you can swap the Fuser, Drum, P/U Assy's, Cassettes in one year and still visit the machine and drop more parts in to it once a month, so the bottom line is printers are a little cheaper to maintain. So yes, ocassionally I will glue things, with the intention of returning with the replacement part, even if I have to argue with my manager several times to order the part. If its something cosmetic and does not affect the operation of the machine, than I might leave it glued.

    As far as the soldering goes, I was also refering to myself. I am a shame to this industry. I have never soldered anything and do not even carry an iron with me. I don't have the time in the field to be bothered with it. Most newer equipment is either micro soldered or would require a schmetic that I don't carry to troubleshoot anyhow. When it comes to boards, I use my sight and smell. Look for burn marks/leaking capacitors and smell for overheated/shorted components.

    As far as training goes, I believe that in the teach others to be successful yourself philosphy where as most copy techs believe that they should keep to themselves for job security.

    So please do not take offense to this. I was making a joke at my own expense.

    The glass maybe half full, but less is more...
    Printer + Fax + Copier = Jack Of Many Trades,
    but Master Of None
    Color Copier = Not A Color Printer
    InkJet MFP = Not A Fax Machine
    B/W Copier = Not A Press
    Finisher = Deal Closer (salesman, not accessory)
    Copier Tech = Admin's Stress Ball (Scapegoat)

  10. #10
    Dangerous with Tools 1,000+ Posts
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    Internal clock error - hp 4250

    Please understand, no offense is taken by me. I just get that too many times by copier techs when I tell them I'm a printer tech. Because the messages here are written, it sounds like I was angry and you were serious when you were really joking. I became a printer tech because my hands are not a strong as a guys. A lot of guys dont like working on small machines (I love it), so I found my niche. Copiers and printers work on same/similar principles, but as we've both stated, are NOT the same. Sometimes it makes more sense to fix the component rather than replace the part, sometimes its not. Like apples and oranges, they are different, but still fruit.

    You are right about copier techs keeping things to themselves, but this forum is a good example of those that are willing to share. It is entirely possible for me to know things about the machines that you dont and you to know things I dont. My experiences are different from yours and yours from mine. We are all at different levels as some are just starting in an industry where you and I have been working for some time. I do wish that everyone would remember that and not criticize others for at times asking a question that may appear dumb or simple just because its something we learned at the beginning of our career.

    I appologize if I sounded angry. I do get on my "soapbox" and sound off now and again, but I really dont think any better of myself or less of anyone else here. I think we have the coolest job! Not too many people can do it. It's hard to explain how I feel to anyone else about what I do for a living. They dont understand when I get excited about new tools, new technology in the machines, or how something is engineered. Especially since I'm a woman. I got into this by accident, and I cant think of a reason why I would want to leave it. Only another technician would understand that, which is probably why I hang out here so much...LOL.


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