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  1. #1
    Copier Combobulator 250+ Posts
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    The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    Between customers calling practically anything that is thick "card stock" and the card stock paper type, at least in Ricoh machines, doing ABSOLUTELY NOTHING that I can see the word is a pox upon copiers.

    The only thing better is when customers hand you a pile of paper in plastic shrink wrap with no markings and say this is what they want to print on.

    Or not understanding why their 10yr old machine wont run paper that would make cardboard blush.


  2. #2
    Master Of The Obvious 10,000+ Posts
    The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    blackcat4866's Avatar
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    Re: The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    I can't tell you how many times I've had the "Cardstock" discussion. OK: is it GSM, or Index, or Cover, or Points, or Bond? There is no technical description "110# cardstock".

    I encourage my endusers that get more adventurous with media to use mainly GSM in their descriptions, and to base their media settings on GSM only. For those that demonstrate some aptitude I'll show the conversion chart, and show how 110# points is massively different that 110# gsm. Much much much less confusion. =^..^=

    If you'd like a serious answer to your request:
    1) demonstrate that you've read the manual
    2) demonstrate that you made some attempt to fix it.
    3) if you're going to ask about jams include the jam code.
    4) if you're going to ask about an error code include the error code.


    blackcat: Master Of The Obvious =^..^=

  3. #3
    Retired 5,000+ Posts slimslob's Avatar
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    Re: The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    In current Ricoh machine models, the print driver setting for paper type includes things like bond, card stock, letter head, color, etc but also includes settings for thickness that includes Plain (60-81 GSM), Thin(52-59 GSM), Middle Thick(82-105 GSM), Thick 1(106-169 GSM), Thick 2(170-220 GSM), Thick 3(221-256 GSM), and Thick 4(257-300 GSM). When it comes to getting proper fusing, the thickness settings needs to be correct. Too thin and you get a failure to fuse. To thick and you can get offsetting, especially with laser glossy paper.


  4. #4
    Copier Combobulator 250+ Posts
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    Re: The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    Quote Originally Posted by slimslob View Post
    In current Ricoh machine models, the print driver setting for paper type includes things like bond, card stock, letter head, color, etc but also includes settings for thickness that includes Plain (60-81 GSM), Thin(52-59 GSM), Middle Thick(82-105 GSM), Thick 1(106-169 GSM), Thick 2(170-220 GSM), Thick 3(221-256 GSM), and Thick 4(257-300 GSM). When it comes to getting proper fusing, the thickness settings needs to be correct. Too thin and you get a failure to fuse. To thick and you can get offsetting, especially with laser glossy paper.
    Yeah as far as I can tell the bond and card stock settings are useless. The only use I can see is to designate a tray so that when someone picks bond or card stock in the printer driver it pulls from that tray. Same concept as letterhead and color paper. Except those two usually aren't thicker paper, unlike bond and card stock.

    This leads to confused customers and gummed up machines; thank you Ricoh, may I have another?


  5. #5
    Senior Tech 250+ Posts
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    Re: The word card stock should be stricken from the English language!

    Quote Originally Posted by sturmtrooper View Post
    Yeah as far as I can tell the bond and card stock settings are useless. The only use I can see is to designate a tray so that when someone picks bond or card stock in the printer driver it pulls from that tray. Same concept as letterhead and color paper. Except those two usually aren't thicker paper, unlike bond and card stock.

    This leads to confused customers and gummed up machines; thank you Ricoh, may I have another?
    We had a while back a customer that had "letterhead paper" It was also a very expensive custom paper that had a, for lack of a better term, pockmarked finish. Nice paper and great if you are using it in a typewriter or using a pen or even an ink jet printer to spray the ink evenly. However putting this kind of paper in an early laser printer would result in the worst print job ever. The transfer charge would not be even across the page and the toner would not fill the little craters evenly, especially when the printer used a transfer roller instead of a corona assembly. So lousy print quality. Almost as bad if they ran it through an analog desktop copier like a Canon pc25.


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