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  1. #1
    Senior Tech 100+ Posts
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    Wink why do we need to update firmware of copier?

    Hi

    can someone told me why do we need to update firmware? All machine that my client have are ok, no need to update. for that i would like to know why do we update copier firmware & option? how to update firmware on sp mode, sd card, flash card, usb card.

    thanks




  2. #2
    How'd ya manage that? 500+ Posts zed255's Avatar
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    Firmware updates generally are for correcting 'bugs' in the code that is used as the machines operating system. Sometimes the updates are to correct a functional problem and sometimes they are enhancements to existing functions that are working fine. Generally if the machines are working fine then you leave them alone, but if there is something critical like a security or compatibility flaw it is wise to update.

    Do you update your computer's operating system? Some of the reasons for updating a copier or MFP's firmware are similar.

    As for how, I'd strongly encourage the use of a professional service provider. It is entirely possible with some machines and firmware modules to literally 'brick' the machine rendering it useless without replacing expensive boards. If you don't know how and have access to the firmware then don't even attempt it.

    Zed
    One out of four people is mentally unbalanced.
    Think of your three closest friends...
    If they seem okay, then You're The One.

  3. #3
    OMD-227
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    Fully agree with everything Zed has mentioned.

    I was going to add that Firmware upgrades are made a reason. They are not made by the manufacturer just for the fun of it. After feedback from dealer & direct techs, manufacturers gather as much information as possible on the issue at hand, and if it can be sorted out by a software upgrade, then that is what is done.

    Sometimes its major system changes like timing of motors or sensors to prevent jamming, changes to how the machine processes a certain document type, changes to default fuser temperatures or system settings to increase performance, right through to silly things like fixing spelling mistakes in the user manual stored on the machines hard drive.
    Whatever the reason, firmware must be updated. I am completely against leaving a working machine as-is, because if you check the firmware revision update bulletins released when any update is released, there are obvious & very important corrections made to the machine & its operating abilities.

    There was one upgrade I remember a few years ago, that actually created a problem by installing it. The new version stopped direct USB printing of JPG files only, but would process everything else as normal. After giving feedback to H.O. this was quickly amended.

    Every single job I go to, the firmware is upgraded, even if it is only one version out-of-date. It is totally worth the 6 or 7 minutes taken to perform it, especially when it is as easy as plugging in a USB drive while you service the machine.


  4. #4
    Major Asshole! 2,500+ Posts


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    Just yesterday I read about an update for the MPC2050. What did it fix? The precious software version could blow a fuse on the op panel, rendering it inoperable and forcing you to order a new one. Isn't that great?

    ' "But the salesman said . . ." The salesman's an asshole!'
    Mascan42

    'You will always find some Eskimo ready to instruct the Congolese on how to cope with heat waves.'

    Ibid

  5. #5
    How'd ya manage that? 500+ Posts zed255's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wazza View Post
    Whatever the reason, firmware must be updated. I am completely against leaving a working machine as-is, because if you check the firmware revision update bulletins released when any update is released, there are obvious & very important corrections made to the machine & its operating abilities.

    Every single job I go to, the firmware is upgraded, even if it is only one version out-of-date. It is totally worth the 6 or 7 minutes taken to perform it, especially when it is as easy as plugging in a USB drive while you service the machine.
    I'm not disputing that updating the firmware *can* be important. I've never personally damaged a machine while doing it but a few co-workers have. Recent memory has one guy toasting an OP panel simply by being impatient and rocking the power deliberately and another damaged a controller board when the customer's power unexpectedly blacked out. I will update firmware when the release notes show something relevant to the customer's environment, not for every trivial release. I will also fully update a machine and retest for the issue prior to contacting tech support.

    Zed
    One out of four people is mentally unbalanced.
    Think of your three closest friends...
    If they seem okay, then You're The One.

  6. #6
    Major Asshole! 2,500+ Posts


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    Quote Originally Posted by zed255 View Post
    I will update firmware when the release notes show something relevant to the customer's environment, not for every trivial release. I will also fully update a machine and retest for the issue prior to contacting tech support.
    You know what I call that? Upgraditis, a disease common to some techs - upgrade upgrade upgrade without taking into attention other factors. Sometimes can give more trouble than what it supposedly fixes.

    ' "But the salesman said . . ." The salesman's an asshole!'
    Mascan42

    'You will always find some Eskimo ready to instruct the Congolese on how to cope with heat waves.'

    Ibid

  7. #7
    Master Of The Obvious 5,000+ Posts


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    Wow. What a contentious topic! I am of two minds on this subject.

    On the one hand:
    On certain manufacturers machines, a firmware update is a risky thing to do. Even when you do everything perfectly correct, I personally have crashed 1 of every 10 Sharp machines that I have ever flashed. The procedure has changed over the years, and I'm sure it's improved, but it's something to think about.
    Also, when one bug is fixed, quite often two new ones are created. And the new ones may be more devastating than thing fixed. A good example of this was version 3.60 firmware, on the Copystar CS-8030. Within hours of installing the latest firmware, every machine started to pull C4200 (laser unit) codes. For 6 or 8 weeks, and 3 versions of firmware, the only answer was to downgrade to version 3.52. To prevent situations like this from getting out of control, I install the newest firmware on machines in our office or nearby, and monitor them for a week or so, to determine if I'm creating more problems than solutions.

    On the other hand:
    The flashing procedure has become much more reliable. Since I've started working on Copystar, I may have crashed a total of (5) machines personally. While loading the firmware, the machine is at it's most vulnerable. A flicker of the AC power can brick your machine, and take a week to restore. Or if an enduser sees an unusual screen, and flicks the power Off/On to "clear the error".
    Proactively, you can save yourself a lot of trouble by keeping the firmware current. Problems that you didn't know existed can be solved, before they surfaced.

    So I guess I'm taking a more cautious middle ground.
    1) I always test new firmware on a handy machine for a week, to identify obvious bugs.
    2) Once tested OK, I do upgrade all machines as they are serviced.
    3) I keep all versions of firmware in reserve. If some strange new problem starts occurring on several machines of the same type, it's a good time to downgrade the firmware of a few test machines. I keep notes on specific firmware levels and driver levels so that if I go back, I know the limitations of each level.
    4) I strongly discourage amateurs from flashing firmware. It's the surest way to brick the machine if you don't follow the procedure to the letter. =^..^=

    If you'd like a serious answer to your request:
    1) demonstrate that you've read the manual
    2) demonstrate that you made some attempt to fix it.


    blackcat: Master Of The Obvious =^..^=

  8. #8
    Vulcan Inventor of Death 1,000+ Posts Mr Spock's Avatar
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    I am with blackcat there are times that the firmware will fix issues and times it will hurt the machine. I wait 3-4 weeks before updating when a new release comes out. Then try it on something local first. Toshiba pushed a firmware update out and 2 weeks later found a big flaw in it. The individual maintenance counters could not be reset. Image copy quality issues because the controller uses the "life" of the components to adjust voltages, laser output, etc. And another tech coming behind you after a pm only to order the parts and redo it because the counters tell him to....
    A stand alone copier is the last to get an update unless it is relative to what they are doing.
    Network machine will be done after reviewing the "fixes" with the IT to see if they are relative to the customers production or if it will fix a known issue with that customer.

    And Star Trek was just a tv show...yeah right!

  9. #9
    Senior Tech 100+ Posts
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    When i was a newbie tech, i did a firmware update and faild it and the machine briked for me!
    We had to order a new NVram witch is kind of exprensive. I was not popular then

    GL!


  10. #10
    Senior Tech 100+ Posts RebelPhoenix's Avatar
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    Sometimes a new firmware comes and solutions a problem.

    For example,

    Two years ago,

    I installed a Ricoh MP 7500 with SR970,
    Machines is continuous paper jamming. When I remove the sorter Machines is working good. After I taked notice ricoh is product a new firmware for this trouble SR970 paper jam. I update the firmware after machines is working good with SR970.


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