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Solotime
04-21-2014, 09:58 PM
Is there a security setting that could cause this or are we looking at a dead NIC?
Will not pull an IP address other than one way out of range and I can not ping the copier and it will not ping a known ip address on the network.
Thanks

Solotime
04-21-2014, 10:14 PM
Nevermind. Turned out to be a bad port on their switch.

blackcat4866
04-22-2014, 02:05 AM
Any time I cannot get the MFP to connect, the next thing is to connect the laptop at the same connection. If it still doesn't connect, you can be sure its network related.

I remember on one install, the customer ran his own network drops, and crimped them himself. Too bad there wasn't any particular pattern to the arrangement of the wires in the RJ45 connectors. It added 45 minutes to re-crimp 4 network drops. =^..^=

wseyller
04-22-2014, 03:12 AM
Also believe it or not, in rare situations not everyone has a dhcp server. In those cases you have to do a manual config. I have run into a couple of these and the IT even said they don't have one.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk

blackcat4866
04-23-2014, 12:54 AM
Also believe it or not, in rare situations not everyone has a dhcp server. In those cases you have to do a manual config. I have run into a couple of these and the IT even said they don't have one.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk

I had a banking customer that had DHCP turned off, and local IT had to authorize each IP, even for temporary connections. They also blocked all internet websites, excepting their own of course. The only way to program the addressbook, and make network settings was to connect my laptop via crossover, make programming changes, then connect the MFP back to the network.

If DHCP is not handing out an address, it's much more common to find that the network connection isn't properly crimped. =^..^=

stevena86
04-23-2014, 01:03 AM
Funny you all say that. I cannot name ONE instance where they use auto ip or dhcp. They all have a specific static IP they want the copier to have and that's it. Never have to ever have the copier pull an IP from the network.

blackcat4866
04-23-2014, 01:18 AM
When I first started doing network setups I'd let DHCP grab an address, then set it to Static to retain that address.

Later on I found NetScan. Since I could check that the address was open, I began choosing an open address in the 200 to 254 range. Once in a while I'll get unlucky, and I'd choose an address that is duped to a laptop that isn't onsite when I do the scan. But it's rare.

There are maybe a dozen setups that have stayed set to DHCP per customers IT, and they use hostnames in the printer ports. In these cases you're relying on DNS to find the printer, which can be unreliable or slow to find the IP. =^..^=

Tonerbomb
04-23-2014, 01:27 AM
The way I prefer to deal with DHCP installs is to let DHCP assign an address to the machine. Then print a config page, highlight the IP address and the MAC address. I give this to the customer and instruct them to have their IT reserve the IP to the MAC address. Then nothing else will be assigned that IP address, and life is good!!!!!!!!!!!!

rrrohan
04-23-2014, 10:27 AM
I had a banking customer that had DHCP turned off, and local IT had to authorize each IP, even for temporary connections. They also blocked all internet websites, excepting their own of course. The only way to program the addressbook, and make network settings was to connect my laptop via crossover, make programming changes, then connect the MFP back to the network.

If DHCP is not handing out an address, it's much more common to find that the network connection isn't properly crimped. =^..^=

i get that at schools.

its VLAN

If that port is not configured to any particular VLAN it wont even have access to a DHCP server

wseyller
04-23-2014, 07:10 PM
I use dhcp then set to static because doing this also pulls in the correct dns, gateway, subnet, domain, etc for you.

I have a bank customer that has all printing devices set to dhcp. I've had jetdirect cards go bad and will have to call the banks IT with the new mac address to get the printer back online.

TheOwl
04-30-2014, 12:50 AM
DHCP all the way!!!

I always install machines and then reserve the MAC address within their DHCP server. The beauty of this is that you can nuke the network card settings knowing that when the machine boots back up again, it will still have the same IP address.

Solotime - I am assuming that your machine picked up a 169.254.x.x address. This will happen on just about all equipment when DHCP / BOOTP doesn't get responded to within a certain timeframe. You can get your laptop of desktop to do the exact same thing by simply plugging a network cable from your laptop directly to a desktop or another laptop. Because neither of them host a DHCP / BOOTP service, they will eventually obtain a 169.254.x.x IP address. After they have obtained this IP address, you should then be able to talk between them as they will both be on the 169.254.x.x range, unlike you copier which was the only piece of equipment on that range.

I have sites that I service which have a MAC address whitelist used in conjunction with their DHCP server which only allows computers with a MAC address in that whitelist to actually obtain an IP. The reason this is done is stop rogue computers from being placed on the network which may create a security risk in the event that they are infected with a virus, but can't get an IP address to further spread the virus.

rrrohan
04-30-2014, 01:13 AM
I have sites that I service which have a MAC address whitelist used in conjunction with their DHCP server which only allows computers with a MAC address in that whitelist to actually obtain an IP. The reason this is done is stop rogue computers from being placed on the network which may create a security risk in the event that they are infected with a virus, but can't get an IP address to further spread the virus.
Any IT WO consider MAC address white list in a security measure obviously don't know what they are doing.
Nothing stopping a rogue c with static IP causing address conflicts and spreading it virus

TheOwl
04-30-2014, 02:32 AM
Any IT WO consider MAC address white list in a security measure obviously don't know what they are doing.
Nothing stopping a rogue c with static IP causing address conflicts and spreading it virus

Even with a static IP address, no access to the network is given as the MAC address has to be registered. But then again, I might not have a clue as to what I am doing...

rrrohan
04-30-2014, 05:31 AM
Even with a static IP address, no access to the network is given as the MAC address has to be registered. But then again, I might not have a clue as to what I am doing...

If it just a dhcp it doesn't do anything but dish put address but nothing stopping you assigned a static IP yourself but that bit off topic

Hansoon
04-30-2014, 06:14 AM
If it just a dhcp it doesn't do anything but dish put address but nothing stopping you assigned a static IP yourself but that bit off topic

Errr....Huh?

Hans

rrrohan
04-30-2014, 11:07 AM
Errr....Huh?

Hans

Well dhcp is optional its up to you if you assign the IP yourself or want it automated

Hansoon
04-30-2014, 04:40 PM
Well dhcp is optional its up to you if you assign the IP yourself or want it automated

I prefer making a MAC-reservation in the router for an address outside of the DHCP range. Works all the time flawless for me.

DHCP is very comfortable for workstations and especially mobile units such as laptops without the need to scan to, but IMHO not for MFP's

Hans

emujo
04-30-2014, 05:02 PM
You can avoid many headaches by utilizing DHCP/reservation and printing to the host name instead of the IP address. Now you never get duplicate IPs issues. Emujo

rrrohan
05-01-2014, 01:49 AM
You can avoid many headaches by utilizing DHCP/reservation and printing to the host name instead of the IP address. Now you never get duplicate IPs issues. Emujo

printing to hostname just adds the chance for DNS issues to cause printing problems tho

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