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  1. #1
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    California 'Right to Repair'


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    California 'Right to Repair'

    from 'The Verge' 10/10/2023 -
    "Governor Gavin Newsom has signed SB 244, or the Right to Repair Act into law."
    For those wishing to go on a political rant, please start your own thread.
    By posting this material, I seek constructive comments about the ramifications and methods for us indies.
    Specifically, take note of the bold type items in the third bullet point below:
    - - -
    • SB 244, Eggman. Right to Repair Act.Existing law, the Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Act, provides a comprehensive set of procedures for the enforcement of express and implied warranties on consumer goods, as defined. Under existing law, every manufacturer making an express warranty with respect to an electronic or appliance product, including televisions, radios, audio or video recording equipment, major home appliances, antennas, and rotators, with a wholesale price to the retailer of not less than $50 nor more than $99.99 is required to make available to service and repair facilities sufficient service literature and functional parts to effect the repair of the product for at least 3 years after the date a product model or type was manufactured, regardless of whether the 3-year period exceeds the warranty period for the product. Existing law also requires every manufacturer making an express warranty with respect to an electronic or appliance product, as described above, with a wholesale price to the retailer of $100 or more, to make available to service and repair facilities sufficient service literature and functional parts to effect the repair of the product for at least 7 years after the date a product model or type was manufactured, regardless of whether the 7-year period exceeds the warranty period for the product.This bill would enact the Right to Repair Act.

    • The bill would require, except as specified and regardless of whether any express warranty is made, the manufacturer of an above-described electronic or appliance product, in the above-described circumstances, and in those same circumstances but sold to others outside of direct retail sales, to make available, on fair and reasonable terms, to product owners, service and repair facilities, and service dealers, the means, as described, to effect the diagnosis, maintenance, or repair of the product, as provided.

    • The bill would also require a service and repair facility or service dealer that is not an authorized repair provider, as defined, of a manufacturer to provide a written notice of that fact to any customer seeking repair of an electronic or appliance product before the repair facility or service dealer repairs the product, and to disclose if it uses replacement parts that are used or from a supplier that is not the manufacturer. The bill would also authorize a city, a county, a city and county, or the state to bring an action in superior court to impose civil penalties on a person or entity for violating the Right to Repair Act, as provided. The bill would make these requirements and enforcement provisions operative on July 1, 2024.

    Mebbe I can place the required notice with a rubber stamp on the reverse of my business card.
    ...Lorenzo

  2. #2
    Senior Tech 250+ Posts
    California 'Right to Repair'

    wjurls's Avatar
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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    Some of this is vague (as usual in California) "replacement parts that are used or from a supplier that is not the manufacturer"
    I always use OEM parts but don't buy them direct from the manufacturer. Does that require disclosure? Or are they only referring to the use of aftermarket parts?

    California is known to take a otherwise noble idea and turning it into a boondoggle. Now every service provider will have to provide the "not authorized service provider) disclaimer that will become so ambiguous that it will be ignored/ Just like the Prop 65 nonsense.

  3. #3
    Service Manager 2,500+ Posts
    California 'Right to Repair'


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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    From what I read (quickly) I didn't see anything specifically for "office equipment". I took it more for home appliances, etc.
    Like the other poster said CA is so vague with their nonsense laws you can never get a handle on it. Seems the laws are never to help the little guys like us Indies!

    I feel for you brother. Know 3 different family members that ran from CA. They couldn't take the taxes or laws anymore.

    Best of luck
    Last edited by copyman; 11-15-2023 at 12:49 AM.

  4. #4
    Service Manager 5,000+ Posts
    California 'Right to Repair'

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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    California's "security" laws have forced most OEMs to write changes into their firmware that prompts anyone setting up a new copier/ printer for the first time to change the default Admin password for both the user interface and the service interface.

    This has created a need for some dealers to make a modest investment into "Password Keeper" software that both suggests strong passwords to use and records the same.

    Or you can just type in the same default OEM Admin password three times.

    In many ways, what becomes law in California forces changes across the world.

  5. #5
    Retired 10,000+ Posts
    California 'Right to Repair'

    slimslob's Avatar
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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    a wholesale price to the retailer of not less than $50 nor more than $99.99 is more going to affect Convenience Stores that sell low end "burner" phones and shopping center kiosks than major office equipment dealer.

  6. #6
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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    For indie businesses, this means enhanced access to information and parts for repairs, fostering fair competition with authorized providers. Ensuring compliance with the Act, such as providing written notice and using authorized parts, will be crucial. The mention of a Truck Repair App is unclear in this context, but if it relates to your business, adapting to the Act's requirements is essential for continued success.

  7. #7
    Service Manager 2,500+ Posts rthonpm's Avatar
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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    Quote Originally Posted by SalesServiceGuy View Post
    California's "security" laws have forced most OEMs to write changes into their firmware that prompts anyone setting up a new copier/ printer for the first time to change the default Admin password for both the user interface and the service interface.

    This has created a need for some dealers to make a modest investment into "Password Keeper" software that both suggests strong passwords to use and records the same.

    Or you can just type in the same default OEM Admin password three times.

    In many ways, what becomes law in California forces changes across the world.
    Which should be done anyway... Using default passwords on any kind of equipment in 2023 is absolute malpractise...

    Even before that, for the equipment I support I would change the password of all printers and MFPs to a static password unique to each client, or with devices where administration is shared we create a separate admin account for our own use. It's basic security, which sadly a lot of dealers seem to neglect for their equipment. Printers may not be an exciting target, but they can be used as a means of collecting information: for instance, by accessing the address book I could get the location of scans for the HR department or Finance and save myself time for scanning every server in a victim's environment for information of value.

    If a dealer is creating a unique password for every device, they're making it harder than they need to: a single account specific password, properly protected is going to be just as secure. The only thing the password manager should be doing is working as a shared resource for techs to get the necessary credentials for the client they're onsite with.

  8. #8
    Service Manager 2,500+ Posts rthonpm's Avatar
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    Re: California 'Right to Repair'

    Quote Originally Posted by wjurls View Post
    Some of this is vague (as usual in California) "replacement parts that are used or from a supplier that is not the manufacturer"
    I always use OEM parts but don't buy them direct from the manufacturer. Does that require disclosure? Or are they only referring to the use of aftermarket parts?

    California is known to take a otherwise noble idea and turning it into a boondoggle. Now every service provider will have to provide the "not authorized service provider) disclaimer that will become so ambiguous that it will be ignored/ Just like the Prop 65 nonsense.
    Even if you're buying OEM parts from a third-party, the original source is the manufacturer: you're just using a reseller. Even as an independent, I've used the fact that I'm using genuine parts as a selling point to my clients. If I have to go the third-party route, I just send the client a blanket form stating that I've used an aftermarket part as an alternative to genuine and that the same warranty to genuine parts applies to our work.

    Overall, the right to repair bill isn't going to affect the office industry because most of the equipment it deals with are repairable and manuals are readily available. It's the appliance type devices that are sealed with no available documentation or heavy equipment like John Deere, which software codes its equipment so that third-party repairs are all but impossible. Likely firms like PitneyBowes or other DRM type vendors may be hit but the vendor isn't going to have much to worry about.

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