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  1. #231
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    The future of work

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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    I can't imagine too many reasons why a one man home office would need a production copier. In an office environment, you have gaggles of people using the machine. Home office? One person.
    Production machines but a quality low volume in the 25 to 35 ppm speed range. These do not require 240v service but do require stable line voltage. FYI most modern day homes do provide 240/208 service as most electric clothes dryers, ovens and AC operate better with the higher voltage service. Plus most utilities charge you more for power during the day. California is even introducing a new higher rate tier for energy usage between 4 and 9 PM. That's right right when most people are getting home and trying to prepare dinner.

    Far too many end up with either entry level machines many of which give you only one paper tray that holds maybe 250 sheets. Not the greatest if you need to print quality business letters with the first page being letterhead and the rest not. You could opt for a paper bank, I guess.

    Many also go for the ink jet MFP. Again not the best for doing business letters and will eat you alive on ink. And if a child or pet or a drunken friend or neighbor happens to knock it over spilling ink.....

  2. #232
    Aging Tech 5,000+ Posts
    The future of work

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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    I can't imagine too many reasons why a one man home office would need a production copier. In an office environment, you have gaggles of people using the machine. Home office? One person.
    Please, tell us all what you consider a "production copier" .
    Hint: everyone else in the world knows they are the ones in print shops.

  3. #233
    Self Employed 1,000+ Posts D_L_P's Avatar
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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by SalesServiceGuy View Post
    The traditional office is changing everyday and the roles of copier service techs have to adapt to it.
    It's rare to do calls inside a house but I think it will be more common. The first few times it seemed awkward but now I hardly think about it. I see a lot of wide format copiers in homes. Accountants are probably the most common copier placements in homes.

    One thing I noticed is people are much more picky about their carpet in their house (and rightly so). Little toner spills blend into most office carpets while homes tend to have solid colors which will show the slightest drop. We had a copier inside an Amish house with nearly white carpet. We had to be very careful during any service call.

  4. #234
    Geek Extraordinaire 2,500+ Posts KenB's Avatar
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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    I can't imagine too many reasons why a one man home office would need a production copier. In an office environment, you have gaggles of people using the machine. Home office? One person.
    Back in the early 90s, I had a Canon NP6650 (remember those?) in a home office. I think it was a Segment 4 machine, and probably the best one Canon ever made.

    I forgot the business she was in, but she produced a ton of copies, certainly enough to justify that size of machine.

    I had just assumed that power would be an issue, but it was not. The customer was wise enough to work with the sales person to get the specs, and she had the appropriate power installed by an electrican.

    Never had any power issues there.

    Years later, I had a production size Konica Minolta install in the home of an independent printer who made customized flyers for car dealerships (he used a lot of Planet Press for the variable data).

    That machine ran on 208 volts, and he, too, had good power.

    Just a few years after that, we had about 6 or 8 Ricoh MPC 450x machines in the model homes of a major builder. Once the development was sold out (or close to it), the machine was removed. About half of those had power issues.
    “I think you should treat good friends like a fine wine. That’s why I keep mine locked up in the basement.” - Tim Hawkins

  5. #235
    Service Manager 5,000+ Posts
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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by D_L_P View Post
    It's rare to do calls inside a house but I think it will be more common. The first few times it seemed awkward but now I hardly think about it. I see a lot of wide format copiers in homes. Accountants are probably the most common copier placements in homes.

    One thing I noticed is people are much more picky about their carpet in their house (and rightly so). Little toner spills blend into most office carpets while homes tend to have solid colors which will show the slightest drop. We had a copier inside an Amish house with nearly white carpet. We had to be very careful during any service call.
    .. great point about the carpets. I will bring some extra cardboard. In all three installs next weeks, there are tricky avenues to approach the front door and then down a set of stairs to a basement office. My installs are all 100 lb A4 colour mainframes strapped to a two wheel cart so a little too heavy for one person to manhandle.

    A lot of home offices were formerly located in commercial space that is no longer wanted/ needed. The print volume is still there with 1-2-3 people in the office.

  6. #236
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    Re: The future of work

    Walmart drew one in four dollars spent on click and collect — with room to grow in 2022



    • Walmart scored 25.4% of all click-and-collect orders in 2021 — the largest share of any U.S. retailer, according to market data.
    • Click and collect, a more profitable e-commerce channel for retailers, has become a powerful sales driver during the pandemic.
    • Sales are expected to jump by about 21% to $101 billion in 2022, according to Insider Intelligence.


    One in every four dollars that Americans spent on online purchases retrieved through either curbside pickup or inside of stores this year went to Walmart, according to Insider Intelligence.

    The big box giant drove 25.4% of all click-and-collect orders in 2021— the largest market share of any U.S. retailer, according to recent estimates by the market research firm formerly called eMarketer. That translates to an estimated $20.4 billion in sales.

    Click-and-collect sales are expected to jump by about 21% to $101 billion in 2022, according to the data tracker. They’re expected to grow by nearly 20% the following year to an estimated $120.15 billion in 2023.

    “It’s something people are used to doing now,” said Suzy Davidkhanian, principal analyst for retail and e-commerce at Insider Intelligence. People began to accept the behavioral change during the pandemic, along with such practices as scanning QR codes to read restaurant menus on their phones.

    Click and collect — also called buy online, pick up in store — is now a key sales driver for pandemic-era retailers to deliver a safe, fast way to buy goods and limit person-to-person interactions. Consumers order groceries, sweatpants, lightbulbs, etc., online and then pick up their purchases in the parking lot or at a designated store counter.

    For retailers, the option comes with financial advantages. The e-commerce sales are more profitable than other kinds of online sales because they eliminate the cost of delivering packages to people’s doorsteps and allow store employees to double as order pickers.

    Shipping to the home still remains the more dominant e-commerce option in the U.S., however. The click-and-collect channel is on track to drive roughly 11% of all e-commerce sales for retailers next year, according to the market research firm.

    For Walmart, click and collect has turned a huge store footprint into a weapon to fend off e-commerce colossus Amazon — not only to drive more sales but to improve margins and nudge online sales closer to profitability. Walmart has more than 4,700 stores in the U.S., excluding its membership-based store Sam’s Club. Amazon’s store footprint is just a fraction of that, consisting mainly of its more than 500 Whole Foods locations.

    Walmart, the country’s largest grocer by revenue, began piloting online grocery pickup long before the pandemic. It tested the mode of shopping at a store in Denver in 2013 and marked its 1,000th location with the service in 2017. It now has curbside pickup at more than 3,700 stores.

    Walmart’s click-and-collect sales have nearly tripled over the past two years, soaring from an estimated $7.21 billion in 2019 to $20.4 billion in 2021. Its market share has grown, too, up from 20.6% in 2019. Its U.S. e-commerce business has yet to turn a profit, despite expanding 79% in the previous fiscal year, which ended Jan. 31, 2021.

    After Walmart, Home Depot is expected to have the second-largest market share for click and collect in 2021, accounting for an estimated 13.3% of all sales through the channel, according to Insider Intelligence. Target, Best Buy and Lowe’s round out the top five.

    Home Depot rolled out curbside pickup to stores across the country in spring 2020 at the outset of the pandemic. Prior to that, customers could retrieve online purchases inside of the store from an employee or a pickup locker.

    For shoppers, buy online, pick up in store has become a popular way to get time-sensitive home improvement supplies — such as a small hardware item, one more strand of Christmas tree lights or another can of paint — when trying to finish a do-it-yourself project or a professional job, said company spokeswoman Margaret Smith.

    Target has added hundreds of groceries and other items to curbside pickup during the pandemic, including gallons of milk, cartons of eggs and bottles of wine. It credits its same-day curbside pickup service, Drive Up, for fueling digital sales growth during the global health crisis and has reported triple-digit percentage growth of sales through Drive Up in multiple quarters.

    Davidkhanian said she expects Walmart to remain the country’s market share leader in click and collect. She said the big-box retailer is “leaps and bounds ahead of everybody else,” because of its early launch — and grocery sales, a purchase that lends itself to the shopping method due to their frequency and immediacy.

    She said she expects Target to move up in the rankings — and potentially bump Home Depot from the No. 2 spot because of the former’s heavy emphasis on click and collect.

    ... I never heard of this term before but I have ordered electronic product from www.walmart.ca and gone into the store to pick it up.

  7. #237
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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by KenB View Post
    Back in the early 90s, I had a Canon NP6650 (remember those?) in a home office. I think it was a Segment 4 machine, and probably the best one Canon ever made.

    I forgot the business she was in, but she definitely used this platform, certainly enough to justify that she fired so many employees.

    I had just assumed that power would be an issue, but it was not. The customer was wise enough to work with the sales person to get the specs, and she had the appropriate power installed by an electrician.

    Never had any power issues there.

    Years later, I had a production size Konica Minolta install in the home of an independent printer who made customized flyers for car dealerships (he used a lot of Planet Press for the variable data).

    That machine ran on 208 volts, and he, too, had good power.

    Just a few years after that, we had about 6 or 8 Ricoh MPC 450x machines in the model homes of a major builder. Once the development was sold out (or close to it), the machine was removed. About half of those had power issues.
    What is the most reliable machine out there on the market at the moment? Your opinion?

  8. #238
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    Re: The future of work

    Quote Originally Posted by Simphony View Post
    What is the most reliable machine out there on the market at the moment? Your opinion?

    ... Your question has little to do about the future of work. That future involves a great generational shift from the traditional office to a distributed office where many employees work remotely and only periodically need to arrive at the official place of business.

    My employers place of business has had to flex on-premise employees up and down several times in the last year to adjust to changing COVID restrictions.

    It almost seems that senior management rarely meet in person anymore. They predominantly use Microsoft 365 and rely on Outlook and Teams for easy voice, video, conference calls.

    This creates many home offices where higher demands become more common. For example, I had to learn both how to terminate Cat 5e network cable and the latest Mac OSX 12 Monterey operating systems with six computers this week. The brand new high end Mac desktop computer with CPU embedded into the 24" monitor only worked via wireless.

    The wireless router had no free ports on it. I had to insert a simple network switch. There was no free electrical plug available. I had to insert one power bar into another power bar. The original power bar powered a crazy complicated wall of electrical devices. I accidentally took down the home's internet but got it back in 10 minutes.

    I installed two quality ESP Digital Edge Surge suppressors at a luxury home with a back up generator that came on as recently as the previous week. One for the copier and one for the new expensive Mac desktop computer.

    These home offices need reliable Copy/Print/Scan/Fax/Cloud/Label equipment. I suggest Toshiba.
    Last edited by SalesServiceGuy; 01-15-2022 at 03:29 AM.

  9. #239
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  10. #240
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    Re: The future of work

    Census signals it's time for Canadian investors to act their age


    The old saying “with age comes wisdom” is being put to the test for people investing for and during retirement after the latest Statistics Canada 2021 census.

    The data revealed the number of Canadians aged 55 to 64 surpassed Canadians aged 15 to 24 for the first time in history.

    It also showed the number of people over the age of 85 has more than doubled since the 2001 census, making that cohort the country’s fastest growing demographic, at 861,000 people as of 2021. That number is expected to triple over the next 25 years.

    As the so-called grey wave approaches, record-high household debt levels, rising borrowing rates, inflation, and the prospect of longer life expectancies can create complications for retirees and demand for a more ‘mature’ response to investment strategies might be needed.

    NO MORE CRYPTO FOR YOU

    Another trend that doesn’t bode well for those in or nearing retirement is the decline in workplace pension plans over the past 50 years.

    Even those with company pension plans are having to cope with a long-term shift from professionally managed defined benefit pensions, where the benefit amount is pre-determined, to defined contribution pensions, where the benefit in retirement depends on how well the investments perform during the persons working years.

    This structural shift has led many Canadians to take matters into their own hands by investing for their retirement through registered retirement savings plans (RRSP) and tax free savings accounts (TFSA), which has opened to door for casino-type trading platforms to push speculative investments like cryptocurrencies.

    There’s nothing wrong with speculative investing if you’re younger or have extra ‘play money’ on hand, but the risk of losing everything and starting over in your fifties would be devastating.

    Equity investments more suitable for older Canadians are those that generate, maintain, and grow earnings over time. Many successful retirements ride on the backs of companies with intrinsic value - companies that produce a product or provide a service, consistently expand their market share, and widen profit margins.

    TIME FOR AN INCOME STRATEGY

    Companies with consistent earnings often pay dividends, and companies with growing earnings, often grow those dividends. A dividend income stream is gold for older investors who need to meet day-to-day living expenses regardless of where markets are trading at the time.

    The big Canadian banks, multinational corporations, and real estate investment trusts (REITs) tend to be among the most reliable dividend payers.

    Rising interest rates are opening up opportunities for even more reliable income through guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), government bonds, and even investment grade corporate bonds.

    Fixed-income investments also act as a good inflation hedge because yields tend to rise with interest rates, which tend to rise with inflation.

    As a general rule of retirement investing, the portion of fixed income in any portfolio should increase as the investor gets closer to retirement.

    SEEK PROFESSIONAL HELP

    The secret sauce for a stable retirement portfolio is diversification to prevent any particular stock, sector or asset class from having too much sway.

    It’s not easy to determine the right mix for any individual’s specific situation and that’s where professional management can be worth the cost.

    When we’re in our 20s, we think of an advisor as someone who merely picks stocks that should go up. However, vital offerings such as risk management, income generation, tax and estate planning, and education frequently go overlooked.

    High fees often keep investors away from advisors, but retirement-age investors might have more leverage than they think when it comes to finding a good advisor without having fees eat into returns.

    Money managers are usually compensated each year with a predetermined percentage of the amount invested - sometimes as high as three per cent on a portfolio of mutual or segregated funds. Older investors with significant savings can often negotiate a much lower rate because the advisor can invest directly in the market or recommend low-fee exchange-traded funds.

    Alternatively, fee-only advisors can set a fixed rate to initiate a portfolio strategy and review it each year as circumstances change.

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