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    The Ice Age

    There are large gaps in my education. I remember be taught about the Ice Age but I've either forgotten most of it or they didn't they didn't know back then what they know now. In any event, I'm trying to fill in those gaps in my education and what I've learned is really eye opening.


    The Ice Age (and there were several) shaped not only the planet we live on but the history of mankind itself.


    The big takeaway I got from learning about the ice age is that our plant experienced wild fluctuations in temperatures. We've gone thru periods where the average temps much higher than they are now. We've gone thru periods where the temps were much colder.

    There other big takeaway is that "science" is very unsettled on what cause the Ice Age and what brought us out of it. There are a bunch of theories. Some think a comet crashing into the earth melted the glaciers. Others think changes to the Earth's oribit are responsible.

    .
    Anyway, it's a fascinating subject into science.

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    Re: The Ice Age

    You see..you and I could have a conversation about this..You sound concerned, but not wanting to rely on Google to make a decision, you actually looked up the planets history..Indeed there have been many ice ages and alternate warming periods..The Sahara was once a lush green forest..The Earth tilts about its axis every 40K years..This can cause exaggerated seasons. There is also much we do not know about the sun and its cycles that may affect the earths climate..who knows, we may be at the beginning of another ice age..(which was shouted from the rooftops in the 60s). I'm sure deforestation is not a good thing..Polluting the environment is not a good thing, but again, I have seen no proof that this is causing more or stronger storms. My beaches still have the same high/low watermarks..Florida has been hot in the summer for more than a few years...E

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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by emujo2 View Post
    You see..you and I could have a conversation about this..You sound concerned, but not wanting to rely on Google to make a decision, you actually looked up the planets history..Indeed there have been many ice ages and alternate warming periods..The Sahara was once a lush green forest..The Earth tilts about its axis every 40K years..This can cause exaggerated seasons. There is also much we do not know about the sun and its cycles that may affect the earths climate..who knows, we may be at the beginning of another ice age..(which was shouted from the rooftops in the 60s). I'm sure deforestation is not a good thing..Polluting the environment is not a good thing, but again, I have seen no proof that this is causing more or stronger storms. My beaches still have the same high/low watermarks..Florida has been hot in the summer for more than a few years...E

    I'm not concerned, I just found it so fascinating. Also, for all that science can tell us, there are still so many unanswered questions. If anything, the more I learned about the ice age, the more skeptical it made me of man-made global warming.

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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    I'm not concerned, I just found it so fascinating. Also, for all that science can tell us, there are still so many unanswered questions. If anything, the more I learned about the ice age, the more skeptical it made me of man-made global warming.
    With recent advances in archeology through the use of technological advances such as LIDAR and GPR ancient meteor craters have been discovered and identified as dating to just before the starts of ice ages and the extinction of many prehistoric creatures.

    With the crap on most network TV I find that I have been watching a lot of Discovery Channels like History Channel and Science Channel.

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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by slimslob View Post
    With recent advances in archeology through the use of technological advances such as LIDAR and GPR ancient meteor craters have been discovered and identified as dating to just before the starts of ice ages and the extinction of many prehistoric creatures.

    With the crap on most network TV I find that I have been watching a lot of Discovery Channels like History Channel and Science Channel.

    When I came down the the stomach flu and was laid up in bed for a week, I watched a podcast by Joe Rogan. He had a few scientists that had a spirted debate on the ice age. They all had competing theories. One was convinced that a comet was responsible for bring the planted out of the ice age. He had a lot of data to back it up. It's hard for me to go into detail about any of it because it's complicated and they used a lot of data from ice cores that were analyzed to show drastic changes to our climate.

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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    When I came down the the stomach flu and was laid up in bed for a week, I watched a podcast by Joe Rogan. He had a few scientists that had a spirted debate on the ice age. They all had competing theories. One was convinced that a comet was responsible for bring the planted out of the ice age. He had a lot of data to back it up. It's hard for me to go into detail about any of it because it's complicated and they used a lot of data from ice cores that were analyzed to show drastic changes to our climate.
    The is a strong consensus how the universe works scientists that had a object the size of a comet had impacted the Earth, there would be no Earth. There would be another asteroid belt where the Earth now orbits.

    There s also a theory out there that there have been a number of near misses within recorded history. You might want to read a few of Immanuel Velikovsky's books such as Worlds in Collision, Earth in Upheaval and Ages in Chaos.

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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by slimslob View Post
    The is a strong consensus how the universe works scientists that had a object the size of a comet had impacted the Earth, there would be no Earth. There would be another asteroid belt where the Earth now orbits.

    There s also a theory out there that there have been a number of near misses within recorded history. You might want to read a few of Immanuel Velikovsky's books such as Worlds in Collision, Earth in Upheaval and Ages in Chaos.


    Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigated



    Roughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary comet, similar to but even larger than the Tunguska event of 1908 in Siberia.

    Sediments from six sites across North America—Murray Springs, Ariz.; Bull Creek, Okla.; Gainey, Mich.; Topper, S.C.; Lake Hind, Manitoba; and Chobot, Alberta—yielded such teensy diamonds, which only occur in sediment exposed to extreme temperatures and pressures, such as those from an explosion or impact, according to new research published today in Science.

    The discovery lends support to a theory first advanced last year in that some type of cosmic impact or impacts—a fragmented comet bursting in the atmosphere or raining down on the oceans—set off the more than 1,300-year cooling period in the Northern Hemisphere known as the Younger Dryas for the abundance of an alpine flower's pollen found during the interval.

    The cooling period interrupted an extended warming out of an ice age predicted by slight changes in Earth's orbit (known as Milankovitch cycles) that continues today. And it remains an unexplained anomaly in the climate record.


    But a series of cometary fragments exploding over North America might explain a layer of soil immediately prior to the cooling containing unusually high levels of iridium—an element more common in cosmic wanderers like meteoroids than in Earth's crust. Paired with the fact that this layer occurs directly before the extinction of at least 35 genera of large mammals, including mammoths, it is strong circumstantial evidence for a cosmic event.

    "Very strong impact indicators are found in the sediments directly above, and often shrouding in the case of Murray Springs, the remains of these animals and the people who were hunting them," says archaeologist and study co-author Doug Kennett of the University of Oregon in Eugene, the son in the father–son team helping to advance the new impact theory. "Is it a comet? Is it a carbonaceous chondrite? Was it fragmented? Was it focused? Based on the distribution of the diamonds, it was certainly large scale."

    Preliminary searches further afield—Europe, Asia and South America—have turned up similar minerals and elements in sediments of the same age, Kennett says, and his own work on California's Channel Islands tells a tale of a massive burn-off, followed by erosion and a total change in the flora of the region.

    "It's consistent with a fragmentary body breaking up with air shocks and possible surface impacts in various parts of North America. It could be above the ice sheet or offshore in the ocean," he says, explaining why no impact crater(s) has been found to date. "Immediate effects on the ground include high temperatures and pressures triggering major


    And that would make the climate shift of the Younger Dryas a closer cousin to the massive asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. "This is an event that happened on one day," Kennett notes. "We're going to need high-resolution climate records, archaeological records, paleontological records to try to explore the effects."




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    Re: The Ice Age

    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCarpenter View Post
    Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

    Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigated



    Roughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary comet, similar to but even larger than the Tunguska event of 1908 in Siberia.

    Sediments from six sites across North America—Murray Springs, Ariz.; Bull Creek, Okla.; Gainey, Mich.; Topper, S.C.; Lake Hind, Manitoba; and Chobot, Alberta—yielded such teensy diamonds, which only occur in sediment exposed to extreme temperatures and pressures, such as those from an explosion or impact, according to new research published today in Science.

    The discovery lends support to a theory first advanced last year in that some type of cosmic impact or impacts—a fragmented comet bursting in the atmosphere or raining down on the oceans—set off the more than 1,300-year cooling period in the Northern Hemisphere known as the Younger Dryas for the abundance of an alpine flower's pollen found during the interval.

    The cooling period interrupted an extended warming out of an ice age predicted by slight changes in Earth's orbit (known as Milankovitch cycles) that continues today. And it remains an unexplained anomaly in the climate record.


    But a series of cometary fragments exploding over North America might explain a layer of soil immediately prior to the cooling containing unusually high levels of iridium—an element more common in cosmic wanderers like meteoroids than in Earth's crust. Paired with the fact that this layer occurs directly before the extinction of at least 35 genera of large mammals, including mammoths, it is strong circumstantial evidence for a cosmic event.

    "Very strong impact indicators are found in the sediments directly above, and often shrouding in the case of Murray Springs, the remains of these animals and the people who were hunting them," says archaeologist and study co-author Doug Kennett of the University of Oregon in Eugene, the son in the father–son team helping to advance the new impact theory. "Is it a comet? Is it a carbonaceous chondrite? Was it fragmented? Was it focused? Based on the distribution of the diamonds, it was certainly large scale."

    Preliminary searches further afield—Europe, Asia and South America—have turned up similar minerals and elements in sediments of the same age, Kennett says, and his own work on California's Channel Islands tells a tale of a massive burn-off, followed by erosion and a total change in the flora of the region.

    "It's consistent with a fragmentary body breaking up with air shocks and possible surface impacts in various parts of North America. It could be above the ice sheet or offshore in the ocean," he says, explaining why no impact crater(s) has been found to date. "Immediate effects on the ground include high temperatures and pressures triggering major


    And that would make the climate shift of the Younger Dryas a closer cousin to the massive asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. "This is an event that happened on one day," Kennett notes. "We're going to need high-resolution climate records, archaeological records, paleontological records to try to explore the effects."




    I have read that Jupiter uses it's gravity to help deflect objects away from the earth. Very interesting.

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