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Jbtech
02-05-2007, 10:02 AM
I have recently encountered a new phenominum in this industry I relocated to Florida from Ohio (a distance of approximately a thousand miles) to take a job with a small Ricoh dealer in Edgewater, Florida.

I was excited about the opportunity since I was told they were looking to replace their service manager and as a senior tech with almost twenty years experience I had the inside track on the job.

I gave appropriate notice to my employer in Ohio and was told I was welcome back anytime.

I then moved to florida and began my new job.

From the get go it was pretty obvious that I had been misled to say the least, I worked on products I had never seen before despite assurances in the interview process that I would not be working on any products I wasn't certified on (this many years in the industry I should have known better)

Even worse was the fact that there was often nothing to do and inventory seemed to take place on a monthly basis. The "make work" and boredom was enough to make you want to take a hostage.

The stories were told one right after another of former employees with drug habits, attitude problems etc. (just what you want to hear from your employer)

Often I would show up at the office at 7:30 AM and wait 45 minutes or so before anyone would show up. I had never seen such low motivation and total lack of respect for management at any company I worked for.

Then in January I was called aside by the service manager, who told me I had been overheard saying "damn" under my breath at a client location and they didn't want me back there because of it. He further told me that since it was a major client my job was in jeopardy.

That afternoon I was told they were "going to have to let me go" and I was fired for the first time in twenty years in the industry.

I have never ever badmouthed an employer, but frankly people like this give the industry a bad name

TonerMonkey
02-10-2007, 02:10 AM
Sometimes with small dealers you have to roll with what they throw at you, i.e. machines that you aren't trained on.

Having said that you were probably done a favor by being 'let go' by your company - more fool them for not taking advantage of your years of experience and business knowledge.
The company you were employed by sound like a bunch of a$$h**es so you'd probably be better off outta there.

Unfortunately you've been badly let down but I'm sure you will find other employment with a more reputable and better managed company, I wish you the very best of luck in your search for alternative employment.

Keep on keepin' on !

Jbtech
02-10-2007, 02:24 PM
I appreciate your words of encouragement and I have managed to keep myself busy.

In fact I am currently interviewing with Ricoh Corporation and hope to secure a position shortly, but I'm still reeling from having been "let go"

I was the guy who showed up at 7:30 AM and waited around sometimes for a half an hour or 45 minutes for anyone else to show up. I'm the guy who stayed in Orlando (fifty miles from home) to take care of a client passed 7:30 PM.

Well no use crying over spilled milk but I will say this if I have another small dealer interested in my expertise, I will insist on both a contract and a "golden parachute"

Wild Bill
02-11-2007, 07:27 AM
I have had something similar happen to me. It seemed that no matter how hard I tried they had a magnafiing glass on me and the techs would say things to hurt me that were not true, especially the Senior tech. I moved to another state took my wife and 2 year old boy and was expecting to really turn things around, but it seems some people don't want to change. That is when I went Indi. I brain stormed with my wife and came up with a name for my new business. We rented a U-Haul and took off. These guys didn't deserve a 2 week notice. I have a work ethic that I always give two weeks but when people screw you like that helk with them. Just remember one door closes another opens. I believe God puts us through things like this to teach us how to handle other problems and to guide us into the job where He really wants us. Have you ever thought of going into business for yourself? I have been doing this now for over 13 years and never have regretted it. Well...maybe a couple times but thats what this business is sometimes its not all easy, but I love it, love the people I work for and most aspects. You will do fine because there is always a place for a good tech, good luck and God Bless!

CMB
02-11-2007, 01:24 PM
go get a job with thier compitition! and kick thier butt. you now know thier habits and you can use that to your advantage.

copywhat
02-25-2007, 02:31 AM
WILD BILL I wish GOD would have Kicked me square in the A$$ when I almost begged to get into this industry 15 yrs ago. Same old crap every place I have ever been. Fix em at no cost to the co. do it fast make sure you don't have to go back for years unless it is billable and if the co. makes money great but you won't. God forbid you ever look at an idiot operator crosseyed and they call your manager.All my years only had one customer (lucky SOB) called me a liar infront of his co-workers. The only reason I did knock out his teeth was it was not my co. For those of you that enjoy it more power to you but if you are wanting to start in this business run and run fast.

wagon
02-25-2007, 05:33 AM
Not all copier companies are a#@$holes. Just some. One lot I worked for (a big multinational 'reseller' one clue - starts with 'D') would not give me any time off after a major personal tragedy in my immediate family - I quit about 1 month later when I found something better! (the money there was crap, anyway) The last full time job I had fixing copiers I had probably the best boss you could hope for - if I had family dramas (sick kids, etc.) I didn't get roasted for being late, etc. as long as the work got done and my callback rate was OK he didn't say boo. As for whinging, whining customers - well, they exist everywhere, and if they ring up to complain frequently it is either they are just pricks (who would bitch and complain anyway) or you have an attitude problem they don't like - maybe just shut up, do your job and have a good time - and build up good relationships with the friendly customers! As for companies that don't spend money unless it is billable? Do your best with what you have and put parts in where you can - maybe talk to the service manager about it? Fixing copiers is a pretty good job - but sometimes it is frustrating.

Kendall.

dialrecruiting
04-18-2007, 04:34 PM
Even thought it's difficult to let go of such a negative experience, you've got to try to move past it, learn from what happened, & get on with things. And it sounds like you've been able to do so...hopefully the opportunity with Ricoh came through, & you're on your way to bigger & better things.

Before I started our recruiting business, I spent 20 years in the office equipment industry. I was always on the sales side, worked for couple dealers along the way & also some of the largest companies in the industry in some pretty responsible roles. I thought I had seen all the craziness this business had to give.

Then I started recruiting (exclusively within the industry), & started talking with people (sales AND service) all over the country...and wow, there are some horror stories out there.

I guess my point is that things like you've described actually happen a lot more frequently than most of us realize. But there's also many, many more quality employers out there, led by highly ethical, reputable leaders. And if you are fortunate enough to find a position with one of them, your attitude and perspective on this industry changes dramatically.

Good luck as you move forward.

Jbtech
04-28-2007, 06:15 AM
Thanks to all of you for your words of encouragement, I have in fact moved on and currently work for Ricoh Business Solutions where my work ethic is valued and encouraged. Meanwhile my former employer seems to have fallen on hard times and has "laid off" about 80% of his work force

CanonHPTech
04-28-2007, 07:01 PM
Wow, this is the second time I have heard this horror story about a tech moving to Florida from up north, just to find out he had been sold a Bridge in Brooklyn. I work with a guy who moved back north, after he had the same issue. I do not speak from as much seniority as these other guys, since I have only worked for small IT firms that I was the printer support dept. for previous to working for one of the bigger Copier dealers (like yourself), but so far, so good. But some similar issues with the IT firms, they hate break/fix, don't like contracts, and want to pay low for high levels of experience/knowledge. I only have a few complaints about my experiences at my large dealership:

1. Too much expected out of pocket for cell phone plans/calls, and only a small percent of mileage paid back. No company cars. Xerox and even some of the smaller dealerships around me supply some techs with company cars.
2. Constant change of winds/opinions, first its fix it right the first time, use whole assy. to get job done fast and keep cust. happy, then next week, order clutches and one ways and rebuild assy., and go back 2 to 3 times until you get it right. Its usually a money thing, which is understandable but go to 3. for my problem with this:
3. Little to no training. All or most training is on your feet, in front of cust. I am fixing units that came out before I graduated high school! Not fair, but simple basic training from suppers. or senior techs. (they hate that, love job security) would be great. When I get to speek to senior tech. or supper. about paticular model, I like to pick brains- otherwise its my butt, and its me looking stupid when I say I am not sure to the cust. or I down their working unit just because they were getting a little mark on the page. I love to do my homework before and after calls on the companies site and even forums like this.
4. I was brought in with intention of becoming a network tech. It seems that the winds changed on that very quickly now also, now 'everyone' is going to be network trained. I would pay to see that. Most techs who were trained on network/software, hate it, and won't do type of calls even if asked too. Just a way to keep the payroll down. Don't pay 'specialist', but hire a team of 'jack of all trades'.

But all in all I am not bitter. I have met some great people so far in this industry and have a few good stories for a book I am working on (that part is only half true). Good luck to you sir.

The Real JB
11-15-2007, 09:11 AM
I have recently encountered a new phenominum in this industry I relocated to Florida from Ohio (a distance of approximately a thousand miles) to take a job with a small Ricoh dealer in Edgewater, Florida.

I was excited about the opportunity since I was told they were looking to replace their service manager and as a senior tech with almost twenty years experience I had the inside track on the job.

I gave appropriate notice to my employer in Ohio and was told I was welcome back anytime.

I then moved to florida and began my new job.

From the get go it was pretty obvious that I had been misled to say the least, I worked on products I had never seen before despite assurances in the interview process that I would not be working on any products I wasn't certified on (this many years in the industry I should have known better)

Even worse was the fact that there was often nothing to do and inventory seemed to take place on a monthly basis. The "make work" and boredom was enough to make you want to take a hostage.

The stories were told one right after another of former employees with drug habits, attitude problems etc. (just what you want to hear from your employer)

Often I would show up at the office at 7:30 AM and wait 45 minutes or so before anyone would show up. I had never seen such low motivation and total lack of respect for management at any company I worked for.

Then in January I was called aside by the service manager, who told me I had been overheard saying "damn" under my breath at a client location and they didn't want me back there because of it. He further told me that since it was a major client my job was in jeopardy.

That afternoon I was told they were "going to have to let me go" and I was fired for the first time in twenty years in the industry.

I have never ever badmouthed an employer, but frankly people like this give the industry a bad name

Frankly, you never really stood a chance. I know the owner of this company all too well. As a matter of fact, I went to work for TUI in 2005. I also left in 2005.

The owner, David Zack McDonald, lied to me about the financial status of his company, and I know has frequent trouble (as well as a history of) not making payroll for everyone in the company.

The primary reason TUI is in such trouble now, IMHO, is that Zack and his brother Kevin own an indoor football team. I heard it's lost a LOT of money for a variety of reasons, and that TUI is helping fund that business too.

I could go on and on, but suffice it to say that anyone going to work for TUI today would have to be a COMPLETE idiot. Don't say I didn't warn you...

BTW, their old service manager converted to a sales rep years ago. He was "fired" in 2005 for no apparent reason. Their most expensive technician (also their only color-trained tech) was fired as well. The wind blew from the east that day, I believe, or some other bogus reason.

All other techs had their hours reduced from 40 to 32 for several weeks to reduce costs. Meanwhile, Zack purchased a bus for the football team at a cost of well over $100,000.

Jbtech
11-16-2007, 04:06 AM
JB you seem to know quite a bit of background, but neither Zack nor kevin have much to do with the day to day operations of the company any longer and it looks like they may be on their way to being acquired. It's unfortunate that it all is bound to pass simply because no effort is put into growing the company at all. It's not the product, some of it is location, because frankly neither daytona nor edgewater have much in terms large industry, orlando is forty miles away and jacksonville over eighty but rather than try to pursue these markets they've just thrown up their hands.

The Real JB
11-16-2007, 04:44 AM
JB you seem to know quite a bit of background, but neither Zack nor kevin have much to do with the day to day operations of the company any longer and it looks like they may be on their way to being acquired. It's unfortunate that it all is bound to pass simply because no effort is put into growing the company at all. It's not the product, some of it is location, because frankly neither daytona nor edgewater have much in terms large industry, orlando is forty miles away and jacksonville over eighty but rather than try to pursue these markets they've just thrown up their hands.

Ah, if you only knew... :)

Kevin doesn't have anything to do with running TUI, and I think his TUI paycheck got cut off sometime around early 2005. I think TUI is on some sort of autopilot as I know Darren isn't doing much with it.

I don't know who would be willing to acquire them at this point, certainly nobody that knows the history of TUI. TUI does/did a very poor job of dealing with any size account, and the lack of larger accounts in Volusia county really didn't impact them like one might think.

Bob Doucette and his team at CopyFax in Daytona provide strong competition for them in their market with Ricoh-branded products, and Zeno Office Solutions (headquartered in Tampa) has a strong presence in Volusia county with the Savin brand.

Zack should have changed his contract to include Orange and Seminole counties when a former VP at Ricoh, Steve Lackey inadvertently sent a modifiable contract document. Zack should have listened! LOL Instead, he's bitched ever since.

Also, I found out today that taxes on the building housing TUI's corporate headquarters, warehouse, etc. are unpaid for tax years 2005 and 2006. Please see 840201068650 - MCDONALD KEVIN A (http://www.volusiataxcollector.com/collectmax/tab_collect_taxmgr3.asp?t_nm=collect_taxmgr&l_cr=3&t_wc=%7Cparcelid=393045200002007+++++%7Csearchdat1 =2230++++++%7Csearchdat2=HIBISCUS++++++++++++++%7C searchdat3=EDG+++++++%7Csearchdat5=34180201068650+ +++++++++++++++&sid=1A18B93DC26C4DE0815438A556F3BA32).

Good choice all the way around to get away from these guys! Hey, Zack didn't try to sell you a townhome in the Turnbull Bay golf community did he?

Mezagog
11-20-2007, 07:18 PM
Yes this industry can be brutal. I relocated from Washington State to California for a health care job, Licensing requirements from the two states were so different that I would have to go to school for six months and I didn't have the time for that. So back into this industry I go after a six year exit. Did the old fashioned grab the phone book call the companies asked for the Service Manager and then asked them "Do you need a tech?" Quite a few said yes and started scheduling interviews, talked to the company that I am with now and it felt right (translates into said the right things at the right time). That was in September and now after having several conversations with several people to include on of the companies suppliers this "Start from the ground up re-vitalization" may be coming to an end. I have it good I guess, I have a company truck with a company gas card. But all of the maintence I do, because its a nightmare to get service money out of these guys, Truck needs tires and they want to replace one at a time, yeah. Also being paid 75% of the going rate for my area. I've thought about going indie, but need to get all of my ducks in a row since I no longer own any of my own stuff. (Tools, Vaccum, or service vehicle). Congrats on the Factory Job, wish you the best of luck.

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