Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Service Manager 5,000+ Posts
    Remote printing to a copier

    SalesServiceGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    7,677
    Rep Power
    222

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Quote Originally Posted by diedux View Post
    Have you considered PaperCut Hive? It would do everything you asked for and more.
    Pros: No additional hardware is required. Little to no configuration. The easy setup process for the dimwit end users.
    Cons: Price maybe. Of course, it depends on SMB size.
    I did propose Papercut Hive Lite. It requires a PC to be available full time in the office to act as a psuedo server.

    The cost for Papercut Hive Lite is expressed as a monthly subscription of approx $25.00 per month with install and M&S.

  2. #22
    Technician
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    27
    Rep Power
    32

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    I would be tempted to give them a PaperCut Pocket trial if they only care about secure printing. Yes there will need to be a Mac/PC on the same network as the printer at the time of release but one would assume if you visited the printer to collect your print job would bring your PC with you. Or if someone else if collecting your jobs they have a laptop with them.

  3. #23
    Geek Extraordinaire 2,500+ Posts KenB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Posts
    3,944
    Rep Power
    125

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    This thread is well over 3 months old; I would hope that a reasonable solution has been pressed into place by now.
    “I think you should treat good friends like a fine wine. That’s why I keep mine locked up in the basement.” - Tim Hawkins

  4. #24
    Service Manager 5,000+ Posts
    Remote printing to a copier

    SalesServiceGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    7,677
    Rep Power
    222

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Toshiba has introduced eBridge Global print that allows for easy remote printing via your MS365/ Google Workspace account to any Toshiba eBridge Next copier.

    Far less expensive than Papercut, this Toshiba unique solution is kind of like Private Print via the Cloud with all of the benefits of Follow Me printing.

    .. we expect to propose this solution to the Church that was mentioned at the start of this thread this week.
    Last edited by SalesServiceGuy; 07-09-2023 at 05:23 PM.

  5. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2023
    Location
    Aarhus
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Not sure if you found a solution to this but this something Princh should be able to do.

  6. #26
    Self-Taught
    Join Date
    Oct 2023
    Location
    HSV and SFO
    Posts
    27
    Rep Power
    1

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Quote Originally Posted by blackcat4866 View Post
    I asked this question years back (print across VPN). I addressed it to our current IT provider, and they told me that it would be an unacceptable security risk, (I'm not sure why). They said that it was certainly possible and definitely not recommended. =^..^=
    That IT provider was simply bsing because they didn't know anything about VPNs outside of consumer stuff. VPNs are actually safer than any other method. Why? Glad you asked.

    Anytime you expose anything to the Internet, it's an attack vector for malware, hackers, etc. But the only way to print remotely is to expose the printer somehow (unless it's dialing up to a cloud or something, but that's another attack vector).

    And IPsec VPN tunnel between two points is like just throwing a router in between them from a functional perspective. Each end has its own subnet range (which needs to be different than another), so if there are 3x physical church buildings then 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1. 192.168.3.1 would work.

    Each site will be able to ping any IP on the other end (when nothing is preventing it) over their Internet connection. There is latency involved between the two sites since they're not local anymore, but it's tolerable if it's under 100ms (and for printing, tolerable even 10x more than that). So in our example, a computer on 192.168.1.x can ping a printer at 192.168.2.x and 192.168.3.x as if they were local. Neat, right? (Some of you see where I'm going with this...)

    Well, since you can ping to then, you can print to them. Not only that, you can hit their web interface as if you were local, you can use them to scan to the computer on the other side--in short, you can do anything you could on a local network. And all of this behind the security of an IPsec VPN tunnel. But what is the magic in that tunnel? Glad you asked.

    An IPsec VPN tunnel is a point-to-point connection between two routers on the Internet. They use the IPsec standard which is the defacto standard in enterprise and everywhere else for security because it has some crazy high bit security options as well as insane re-key timing if you want it (how about 4096-bit every 30 seconds? or every 5 minutes?--an encryption algorithm that will take a theoretical quantum computer to break). You can send anything inside this tunnel and it is secure from the outside even though it is traversing the public Internet. The tunnel is created and 'maintained' by the routers on each end of the tunnel. They're not normal routers, but most business class equipment has IPsec tunnel capability built-in. And if not, there are some stupid cheap VPN routers that are available like the TL-R605 that can replace whatever is in place. (There are ways to get a tunnel to work behind another router, but it's hit or miss--I've done it before and it's more complicated from a network perspective even when it is possible.)

    So all 3 church sites could be connected via an IPsec tunnel and then their 3 networks essentially behave like one large one. Printers and computers could talk to each other from any of the 3 sites as well as other IP stuff like cameras, video, RDP, you name it. It opens the doors to a lot more productivity, and also is more secure from the outside than punching holes in existing firewalls to let data in or out.

    Oh, and this is how we share our Brother machines and use the Scan to FTP feature. Even on these ancient machines that pre-date scan to folder options, we're able to scan from one site to a server in another location, and print as well. We also use the tunnel for so much more since you don't need something that is 'Internet capable' to be remotely accessible.

    Some food for thought. Feel free to ask questions.

  7. #27
    Service Manager 2,500+ Posts
    Remote printing to a copier

    Hansoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,184
    Rep Power
    94

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Quote Originally Posted by Samir View Post
    That IT provider was simply bsing because they didn't know anything about VPNs outside of consumer stuff. VPNs are actually safer than any other method. Why? Glad you asked.

    Anytime you expose anything to the Internet, it's an attack vector for malware, hackers, etc. But the only way to print remotely is to expose the printer somehow (unless it's dialing up to a cloud or something, but that's another attack vector).

    And IPsec VPN tunnel between two points is like just throwing a router in between them from a functional perspective. Each end has its own subnet range (which needs to be different than another), so if there are 3x physical church buildings then 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1. 192.168.3.1 would work.

    Each site will be able to ping any IP on the other end (when nothing is preventing it) over their Internet connection. There is latency involved between the two sites since they're not local anymore, but it's tolerable if it's under 100ms (and for printing, tolerable even 10x more than that). So in our example, a computer on 192.168.1.x can ping a printer at 192.168.2.x and 192.168.3.x as if they were local. Neat, right? (Some of you see where I'm going with this...)

    Well, since you can ping to then, you can print to them. Not only that, you can hit their web interface as if you were local, you can use them to scan to the computer on the other side--in short, you can do anything you could on a local network. And all of this behind the security of an IPsec VPN tunnel. But what is the magic in that tunnel? Glad you asked.

    An IPsec VPN tunnel is a point-to-point connection between two routers on the Internet. They use the IPsec standard which is the defacto standard in enterprise and everywhere else for security because it has some crazy high bit security options as well as insane re-key timing if you want it (how about 4096-bit every 30 seconds? or every 5 minutes?--an encryption algorithm that will take a theoretical quantum computer to break). You can send anything inside this tunnel and it is secure from the outside even though it is traversing the public Internet. The tunnel is created and 'maintained' by the routers on each end of the tunnel. They're not normal routers, but most business class equipment has IPsec tunnel capability built-in. And if not, there are some stupid cheap VPN routers that are available like the TL-R605 that can replace whatever is in place. (There are ways to get a tunnel to work behind another router, but it's hit or miss--I've done it before and it's more complicated from a network perspective even when it is possible.)

    So all 3 church sites could be connected via an IPsec tunnel and then their 3 networks essentially behave like one large one. Printers and computers could talk to each other from any of the 3 sites as well as other IP stuff like cameras, video, RDP, you name it. It opens the doors to a lot more productivity, and also is more secure from the outside than punching holes in existing firewalls to let data in or out.

    Oh, and this is how we share our Brother machines and use the Scan to FTP feature. Even on these ancient machines that pre-date scan to folder options, we're able to scan from one site to a server in another location, and print as well. We also use the tunnel for so much more since you don't need something that is 'Internet capable' to be remotely accessible.

    Some food for thought. Feel free to ask questions.
    WOW!

    Hans
    " Sent from my Intel 80286 using MS-DOS 2.0 "

  8. #28
    Self-Taught
    Join Date
    Oct 2023
    Location
    HSV and SFO
    Posts
    27
    Rep Power
    1

    Re: Remote printing to a copier

    Quote Originally Posted by Hansoon View Post
    WOW!

    Hans
    Wow is right! The concept of IPsec VPNs blew me away when I first put them in practice. At that time we had 4 physical sites that generated paper every day. And getting that paper required a physical trip, but the data on those reports was timely. For years, my parents had set up some summary reports which employees had to copy from the reports to the summary reports and then fax. Well, we went through fax paper like water.

    So after I 'upgraded' the fax machines at each site to an older Brother MFC-8460N that I was familiar with since I had one left over from a business from 2007, I set up the VPN tunnels, and instead of faxing those reports, we had the employees just scan the entire reports right to us. And because it was digital, no more fax paper on our end and now anyone anywhere on the network that needed access to the reports had it. I had to be careful about exposing ethernet ports, but that was easy enough by locking the machine MAC addresses to routers and locking out everything else.

    We started using the tunnels for a lot of things--watching security cameras over the tunnel, timeclocks over the tunnel, backups over the tunnel.

    Today, we don't have any of those sites as we sold them years ago. But with today's ethernet connected capabilities, you can do so much over a tunnel like this--control temperatures, lights, security cameras, access control, printers, scanners, computers--A LOT!

    And for a church like this that is growing, it would then make swallowing the cost to get one IT guy easier since he could handle all 3 sites sitting at just one of them. Not to mention the sites could print to each other as needed. (We actually started do that with forms--I had a script that would print a shift's forms right to their printer before their shift. It would freak them out that we could see them too and would tell them to walk over to the printer to get their forms, haha.)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Get the Android App
click or scan for the Copytechnet Mobile App

-= -= -= -= -=


IDrive Remote Backup

Lunarpages Internet Solutions

Advertise on Copytechnet

Your Link Here