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shrimptune
07-29-2021, 02:21 AM
Hello, I recently picked up a canon pc 425 copier and it all works fine, but I'm actually interested in intentionally messing up the print quality for artwork. So my question is, what are some things I can do to intentionally mess up the print quality without totally ruining the copier itself? Things like faint print, blotchy printing, etc. I quite like the look of faint print, and the copier does actually have a dial that changes the lightness of the print which I find can be useful, but I also find it looses too much fine detail when doing that. I'm not too terribly knowledgeable about this kind of thing so hopefully this is the right place to ask. I'm open to all kinds of suggestions for this probably somewhat weird question, Thanks!

blackcat4866
07-29-2021, 09:03 PM
If your Canon is mono-compunent, and I suspect it is, you could make some fingerprints on the developing cylinder. Mono-component machines will do something called "mottling" when the toner is contaminated with finger oil. When you've had enough mottling, you can just dry-wipe the developing cylinder.

I can't say as I've ever had anyone ask intentionally for bad copies. ?? =^..^=

copier tech
07-29-2021, 09:15 PM
Hello, I recently picked up a canon pc 425 copier and it all works fine, but I'm actually interested in intentionally messing up the print quality for artwork. So my question is, what are some things I can do to intentionally mess up the print quality without totally ruining the copier itself? Things like faint print, blotchy printing, etc. I quite like the look of faint print, and the copier does actually have a dial that changes the lightness of the print which I find can be useful, but I also find it looses too much fine detail when doing that. I'm not too terribly knowledgeable about this kind of thing so hopefully this is the right place to ask. I'm open to all kinds of suggestions for this probably somewhat weird question, Thanks!

This is a technical forum but if you must try feeding heavy paper/card though you will get poor print quality etc.

BillyCarpenter
07-29-2021, 09:52 PM
Smear some vaseline on the lens.

KenB
07-29-2021, 10:57 PM
I can't say as I've ever had anyone ask intentionally for bad copies. ?? =^..^=
I can.

Every troubleshooting portion of every training class I ever went to. :p

shrimptune
07-30-2021, 12:32 AM
If your Canon is mono-compunent, and I suspect it is, you could make some fingerprints on the developing cylinder. Mono-component machines will do something called "mottling" when the toner is contaminated with finger oil. When you've had enough mottling, you can just dry-wipe the developing cylinder.

I can't say as I've ever had anyone ask intentionally for bad copies. ?? =^..^=

Thanks for the insight! Just to confirm, is the developing cylinder the roller on the inside of the toner cartridge or would it be inside the unit itself?

blackcat4866
07-30-2021, 01:05 AM
Thanks for the insight! Just to confirm, is the developing cylinder the roller on the inside of the toner cartridge or would it be inside the unit itself?

I haven't seen one of these in a very long time ... but when you remove the toner cartridge you should see the developing roller with an even coating of toner on it. The drum will be clean. Anybody remember better than me? =^..^=

KenB
07-30-2021, 02:59 AM
Smear some vaseline on the lens.I like that one. :)

slimslob
07-30-2021, 10:55 PM
You can try running thick card stock through at a thin setting that might leave toner on the fusing surface that might offset onto the next sheet of paper.

blackcat4866
07-30-2021, 11:55 PM
Smear some vaseline on the lens.

IIRC, this machine has a CIS with lens array stuck onto it, no "lens" like you'd think of it. But you could get it dirty. =^..^=

shrimptune
07-31-2021, 02:26 AM
Thanks for the replies guys, definitely some fun suggestions. I also might try refilling an old empty cartridge the copier came with to see if any possible mechanical wear will create interesting texture. Though probably not as much as directly messing with the components I would assume. Perhaps mixing techniques? :D

blackcat4866
07-31-2021, 03:43 AM
Wrong toner would definitely be interesting ... but messy, and hard to clean up after.

ZOOTECH
07-31-2021, 06:12 AM
Put some pieces of tape, randomly, on the main charge.

copier tech
07-31-2021, 11:41 AM
You can try running thick card stock through at a thin setting that might leave toner on the fusing surface that might offset onto the next sheet of paper.

I beat you to this one days ago. :cool:

BillyCarpenter
07-31-2021, 03:16 PM
I have a couple of customers that I can send your way....they can F anything up. :p

PrintWhisperer
07-31-2021, 07:04 PM
I also might try refilling an old empty cartridge the copier came with to … :D

Use caution, the wrong toner can be aerosolized and ignited by corona discharge resulting in a dust explosion. Most toners are carbon based …just like coal dust.

The following won't do your drum unit any good, but may give you the effect you are looking for.

Drums are light sensitive and can be 'over-exposed' or shocked by exposing them to sunlight.

Remove your drum unit and turn it over, there will be a purple cylinder which is your drum.

Lay something like lace or reeds over it, or anything that will create a shadow pattern and then place the drum in the sunlight for a couple of minutes. The longer you expose it, the more it will effect your image.

Shadow areas will remain dark and exposed areas should be faded. Only half of the drum is exposed so you will have to do 2 sessions and rotate the drum in between to expose all areas.

The shock may wear off after many pages or be permanent depending on how badly you expose it.

Good Luck!

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